End of July the once-every-4-years hacker mass event, this edition titled May Contain Hackers, will take place. As usual it takes place in the midst of the summer holidays, meaning as a parent of a school age kid I won’t be able to make it personally. However I’m very pleased that my company and our team, together with friends from our immediate professional network (not coincidentally veterans of E’s 2018 birthday unconference), are working together to host one of the Villages at MCH2022!

Our Village is called ‘ethisch party’ in Dutch, ethical party in English. In Dutch ethical rhymes with 80s in English. Therefore it’s listed as the Village 80s Party, ‘putting the 80s back into the ethics’. Data ethics is the general context for the village’s program.

You’re welcome to join and get involved!

Public Spaces is an effort to reshape the internet experience towards a much larger emphasis on, well, public spaces. Currently most online public debate is taking place in silos provided by monopolistic corporations, where public values will always be trumped by value extraction regardless of externalised costs to communities, ethics, and society. Today the Public Spaces 2022 conference took place. I watched the 2021 edition online, but this time decided to be in the room. This to have time to interact with other participants and see who sees itself as part of this effort. Public Spaces is supported by 50 or so organisations, one of which I’m a board member of. Despite that nominal involvement I am still somewhat unclear about what the purpose of Public Spaces as a movement, not as an intention, is. This first day of the 2-day conference didn’t make that clearer to me, but the actual sessions and conversations were definitely worthwile to me.

Some first observations that I jotted down on the way home, below the photo taken just before the start of the conference.

a) In the audience and on stage there were some known faces, but mostly people unknown to me. Good thing, as it demonstrates how many new entrants into these discussions there are. At the same time there was also a notable absence of faces, e.g. from the organisations part of the Public Spaces effort. Maybe it’s because they rather show up tomorrow when the deputy minister is also present. As an awareness raising exercise, despite this still being a rather niche and like minded audience, this conference is certainly valuable.

b) That value was I think mostly expressed by the attention given to explaining some of the newly agreed European laws, the Digital Markets Act, Digitals Services Act and Data Governance Act. For most of the audience this looks like the first actual encounter with what those laws say, and one panel moderator upon hearing its contents showed themselves surprised this was already decided regulation and not stuck somewhere in a long and slow pipeline of debate and lobbying.

c) It was very good to hear people on stage actually speaking enthusiastically about the things these new laws deliver, despite being cautious about the pace of implementation and when we’ll see the actual impact of these rules. Lotje Beek of Bits of Freedom was enthusiastic about the Digital Services Act and I applaud the work BoF has done in the past years on this. (Disclosure: I’m on the board of an NGO that joins forces with BoF and Waag, organiser of this conference, in the so-called Digital Four, which lobbies the Dutch government on digital affairs.)
Similarly Kim van Sparrentak, MEP for the Greens, talked with energy about the Digital Markets Act. This was very important I think, and helps impress on the audience to engage with these new laws and the tools they provide.

d) The opening talk by Miriam Rasch I enjoyed a lot. Her earlier book Friction E felt seemingly lacked some deeper understanding of the technologies involved to build the conclusions and arguments on, so I was interested in hearing her talk in person. The focus today was more on her second book Autonomy. I‘ll buy bought it and will read it, also to clarify whether some of the things I think I heard are my misunderstanding or parts of the ideas expressed in the book. Rasch positions autonomy as the key thing to guard and strengthen. She doesn’t mean autonomy in the sense of being fully disconnected from everyone else in your decisions, but in a more interdependent way. To make your own choices, within the network of relationships around you. Also as an emotionally rooted thing, which I thought is a useful insight. She does position it as something exclusively individual. At the same time it seems she equates autonomy with agency, and I think agency does not merely reside on the individual level but also in groups of relationships in a given context (I call it networked agency). It seemed a very westernised individualistic viewpoint, that I think sets you up for less autonomy because it pits you individually against the much bigger systems and structures that erode your autonomy, dumping you in a very assymetric power struggle. A second thing that stood out to me is how she expresses the me-against-the-system issue as one of autonomy versus automation. It’s a nice alliteration, but I don’t accept that juxtaposition. It’s definitely the case that automation is frequently used to dehumanise lots of decisions, and thus eroding the autonomy of those being decided about. But to me it’s not inherent in automation. When you have the logic of (corporate) bureacracies doing the automation, you’ll end up with automation that mimics that logic. If I do the automation it will mimic my logic. I use automation a lot for my own purposes, and it increases my agency, it’s a direct expression of my autonomy (or that of the groups I’m part of). There’s more to be said, in a separate post, a.o. about the 3 or 4 thinking exercises she took us through to explore autonomy as a concept for ourselves. After all it wouldn’t make us more autonomous if she would prescribe us her definition of autonomy, precisely because she underscores that it’s not a purely rational concept but an emotional one as well.

e) Prof. Tamar Sharon of Radboud University spoke about the influence tech companies have in other domains than tech itself because of their technology being expanded into or used in those domains such as health, education, spatial planning, media. She calls it sphere transgressions. This may bring value, but may also be problematic. She showed a very cool tool that visualises how various tech companies are influential in domains you don’t immediately associate them with. A good thinking aid I think also in the upcoming discussion about sectoral European data spaces and being alert to the pitfall of it turning into a tech dominated discussion, rather than a societal benefit and impact discussion.

f) Kudos to the conference organisers. Every panel composition was nicely balanced, it shows good care in curating the program and having tapped into a high quality network. I know from experience that it takes deliberate effort to make it so. Also the catering was fully vegetarian and vegan, no words wasted on it, just by default. That’s the way to go.

Nancy writes about the importance of endings, a rich source for reflection and of insights. And suggests it as something we should be more literate in, more deliberate in as a practice.

Yes, endings, acknowledging them, shaping them, is important.
When the BlogWalk series already had practically ended, with the last session being 18 months or so in the past, it was only when I posted about formally ending it, that it was truly done. It allowed those who participated to share stories about what it had meant to them, to say thanks, and it was a release for the organisers as well.

In our short e-book about unconferencing your birthday party (in itself a gift we sent to the participants of the most recent event it described, a year afterwards) we made a point to write about a proper ending. We had been at many events where the end was just when people left, but also at those where the end was a celebration of what we did together. We wrote "So often we were at a conference where the organizers didn’t know how to create a proper end to it. Either they’re too shy to take credit for what they’ve pulled off or they assume that most people left already and the end of the program is the last speaker to be on stage. Closure is important. It doesn’t have to be long, it doesn’t have to be a closing keynote, but it should serve as a focal point for everyone to end the day and give them an opportunity to thank you and each other as a group, not just as individuals. We gathered everyone after the last session and made some closing remarks, the most important of which was ‘thank you!’. […] Obviously this was the time to open up a few bottles as well."

In an Open Space style setting as a moderator I find releasing the space at the end for me usually involves strong emotions, coming down to earth from creating and surfing the group’s collective energy and shared attention, from weaving the tapestry of the experience together. When E and I helped P create such a space in 2019 I wrote afterwards "When Peter thanked Elmine and they embraced, that was the moment I felt myself release the space I had opened up on Day 1 when I helped the group" settle into the event and "set the schedule. Where the soap bubble we blew collapsed again, no longer able to hold the surface tension. I felt a wave of emotions wash through me, which I recognise from our own events as well. The realisation of the beauty of the collective experience you created, the connections made, the vulnerability allowed, the fun had, the playfulness. We wound down from that rush chatting over drinks in the moon lit back yard."

Endings such as those Nancy describes and the examples I mention, need their own space. It’s not a side effect of stopping doing something, but an act in itself that deserves consideration. As Nancy suggests, a practice.

Gisteravond vond de 3e Nederlandstalige Obsidian meet-up plaats, dit keer met zeven deelnemers. Organisator was Christian. Het was al weer even geleden dat ik de eerste 2 sessies hield. Veel langer geleden dan ik me realiseerde toen ik het tijdens de sessie gisteren opzocht (de eerste was in april, de tweede in juli)

Omdat ik ziek in bed lig deed ik mee zonder camera en geluid. Af en toe liet ik van me horen in de chat van de online meet-up. Enkele voor mij bekende gezichten, zoals Wouter en Willy, en vooral nieuwe. Dat was prettig want zo hoor je nieuwe dingen.

Een paar dingen die me opvielen en in me opkwamen, voor mijn beperkte energie op was, en ik het gesprek verliet:

Ieder van ons heeft een lange geschiedenis met notitie-apps, en uiteindelijk wint volgens mij de toepassing die niet alleen frictie reduceert om dingen op te slaan en met die dingen te werken, maar die ook andere wegen openhoudt en je niet opsluit in het denken van de maker van de tool. Op een gegeven moment ging het over welke plugins we gebruiken, en ook daar hoorde je reserve voor plugins die je ‘opsluiten’ in de tool, d.w.z. die niet alleen functionaliteit toevoegen, maar ook inhoud die vervolgens buiten Obsidian niet toegankelijk is (in de platte tekstfiles waarin je notities zijn opgeslagen). Later las ik dat er een plugin is die dat opsluitend effect expliciet probeert tegen te gaan voor wat Obsidian zelf aan gegevens opslaat: de Obsidian metadata-extractor die de metadata naar je harde schijf schrijft zodat andere applicaties (zoals bijv AlfredApp) er bij kunnen. Hiermee kun je Obsidian directer vanuit andere applicaties aansturen als je wilt.

Digitaal eerst, of niet?

Digitaal of eerst op papier? Dat is een vraag die al vroeg aan bod kwam. Mede naar aanleiding van hoe Wouter Obsidian gebruikt. Hij doet alles eerst op papier, scant die pagina’s (met Genius Scan van Grizzly Labs op zijn telefoon), en maakt bij elke foto een korte index, zodat hij via de zoekfunctie de juiste scans kan vinden. Na de eerste meet-up waarin hij dat ook vertelde, ben ik mijn eigen papieren notitieboeken ook gaan scannen, met mijn CZUR staande scanner, en maak daar eveneens indexes bij. Dit keer werd me duidelijk dat hij dat net iets anders doet dan ik heb gedaan. Ik maak 1 index per notebook met links naar de plaatjes in de vorm “plaatje12 over #opendata en gesprek met XYZ”, Wouter maakt per scan een note met daarin zijn annotaties, zodat je de afbeelding meteen boven die annotaties ziet staan. Dat lijkt me weliswaar eleganter, maar ook meer werk.

Al heb ik zelf een sterke voorkeur in het meteen digitaal maken van mijn notities, is de rol van papier en pen wel degelijk belangrijk. De reden om als het kan digitaal-eerst te werken heeft vooral met de frictie te maken die de latere omzetting naar digitaal nog altijd betekent. Sinds klas 5 van de basisschool houd ik al notitieblokken vol aantekeningen bij. Dat is 4 decennia aan notitieblokken.
Fysiek iets schrijven is anders en levert andere verbindingen op dan tekst tikken op het scherm.
Fysiek omgaan met bestaande notities heeft dat andere effect ook bij mij: ik plak met enige regelmaat een reeks post-its met inhoud uit mijn notes op de muur om beter te snappen wat onderlinge verbanden kunnen zijn, ‘gaten’ te zien. Ik kan dat welisaar ook in tools als Tinderbox visueel doen op mijn scherm, maar het werkt anders omdat ik dan mijn handen niet gebruik, niet voor de muur in mijn kamer heen en weer drentel etc.

We hadden het ook over lezen op papier of digitaal. Ook daar speelt voor mij de wrijving een rol in hoe je aantekeningen later digitaal kunt verwerken. Ik lees vooral digitaal (het is veelal goedkoper en scheelt thuis vooral enorm veel ruimte), maar voor non-fictie is mijn eigenlijke voorkeur papier, vanwege het overzicht dat het biedt op een manier die e-readers nog altijd niet weten te bieden. Op mijn e-ink device, en voor PDFs die ik in Zotero verzamel is dingen in boeken markeren of in de kantlijn schrijven inmiddels naadloos naar mijn notities te krijgen, zodat ik ze daar inhoudelijk kan verwerken. In deze context werd ook het boek Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain van Maryanne Wolf genoemd.

Visueel en tekstgericht

Markdown is een opmaaktaal voor tekst, en Obsidian is een viewer op markdown files, en dus in principe geheel tekstgericht. Je kunt wel plaatjes opnemen maar dat zijn passieve afbeeldingen. Je kunt daarnaast Mermaid diagrammen maken, als manier om in tekst een diagram te definieren.
Tot nu toe was dat weinig nuttig voor me, omdat ik eigenlijk uitsluitend in edit-mode werk, en dan zie je alleen je eigen ruwe tekst, niet de opmaak of het diagram als je die toevoegt. Het is de reden dat veel mensen gelijktijdig de markdown tekst waarin ze werken en het visuele resultaat naast elkaar op hun scherm toonden, maar ik doe dat eigenlijk nooit.
Nu is er sinds kort de Live Preview modus (in beta), waarin je eigenlijk altijd het opgemaakte resultaat van je tekst ziet, totdat je je cursor ergens zet en begint te editen. Dan wordt daar lokaal je orginele markdown zichtbaar. Ik heb nu geen extra muisklikken nodig, en hoef geen extra schermpjes open te hebben om mijn markdown ‘live’ te zien. Dat maakt het weer veel aantrekkelijker voor me om ook visuele elementen in mijn notities (te proberen) te gebruiken.
Een van de deelnemers is een eindexamenkandidaat die de stof deels ook in schetsen en diagrammen vertaalt. Iets visueel maken helpt bij het internaliseren van stof, maar ook bij het naar voren halen van die kennis als je de afbeelding weer ziet. Ingewikkelde complexe dingen laten zich vaak makkelijker in een schets vangen dan in een platte tekst die per definitie lineariteit en hiërarchie suggereert. Tot mijn verrassing gebruikte hij een schetstool die volledig in Obsidian te integreren is, en waarmee je ook zelfs links in een afbeelding naar andere notes kunt opnemen. Die schetstool is Excalidraw, in principe een browsergebaseerde tool. waarvoor iemand een Obsidian plugin heeft gemaakt. Excalidraw is net als Obsidian zelf nog maar anderhalf jaar oud. Daar ga ik zeker mee experimenteren.

In de context van schetsen maken kwam ook The Back of the Napkin van Dan Roam ter sprake, en ik moest zelf ook denken aan sketchnoting en The Sketchnote Handbook van Mike Rohde (alleen al een tof boek omdat ik er in sta 😉 )

Een van de andere deelnemers, Roy Scholten is nadrukkelijk bezig met de rol van visualisatie in het overbrengen van kennis en het helpen bij duiding. Zijn blog Bildung zit vanaf nu in mijn feedreader.

Werk en Privé

Het laatste dat ik even wil aanstippen was een gesprek over of je in je notities werk en privé mengt of juist scheidt, en of je er aparte vaults (losse collecties in Obsidian) voor bijhoudt. Bij mij zit alles op 1 plek, onderscheid maak ik in een folderstructuur zodat dingen over bijvoorbeeld ons huishouden niet staan tussen dingen over een huidig klantproject. Al mijn conceptuele notities zitten wel in één folder, ongeacht het onderwerp, want daar telt de onderlinge (netwerk)verbinding het zwaarst. Mijn folderstructuur is niet thematisch gesplitst maar in aandachtsgebieden in mijn leven (zoals in de Getting Things Done methodiek, en in PARA al zitten mijn projecten allemaal in zo’n aandachtsgebied, anders dan PARA). Voor de genoemde eindexamenkandidaat lag er een splitsing tussen school en de rest, en dat kan ik me goed voorstellen. Je notities voor je eindexamen komen voort uit iets dat je wordt opgelegd, iets vooral buiten je eigen directe interesses of activiteiten. (Tijdens je studie is dat weer net wat anders, daar ontdek je juist welke aspecten je straks in je professie boeiend vindt, dus daar wordt het meer eigen, en minder externe verwachting ondanks de tentamenstructuur). Sommigen doen het net als ik, waar ‘alles’ in het systeem zit. Mijn PKM is deels gebouwd op Getting Things Done en daaruit vloeit die ‘allesomvattendheid’ al voort, maar ook op mijn persoonlijk opvatting dat er weinig verschil is tussen werk en niet-werk voor mij. In die context werd ook gesproken over Kanban of Trello boards voor thuis. Mijn primaire tools voor mijn werk en voor thuis zijn identiek eigenlijk, voor klanten hanteer ik daarnaast meestal andere (die ik grotendeels niet thuis zou willen inzetten, dat is waar). Het thuis hanteren van uit je werk bekende methoden om zo de logistiek thuis te vergemakkelijken, en ruimte te maken voor elkaar lijkt me vooral gezond. Onze eerste verjaardagsconferentie in 2008 ging al hierover.

Dank aan Christian voor het organiseren van deze bijeenkomst, en alle deelnemers voor het delen van hun ervaringen en werkwijzen.

Ook met andere Nederlandstalige Obsidiangebruikers van gedachten wisselen? Die Nederlandstalige Obsidian gebruikers vind je ‘allemaal’ op het Obsidian Discord kanaal #nederlands.

Favorited IAM Weekend and The Everything manifesto: A thought experiment for the next billion seconds (HT Johannes Klingebiel‘s German newsletter)

The IAM weekend looks like a very worthwile event, and I hope to follow some of it online. Beforehand I’ll also read their ‘Everything Manifesto’ to better understand their perspective.

What if we come together to reimagine the internet(s) as sustainable networks for solidarity and care?

To contribute in creative, collaborative and collective ways to the reimagination of the digital economy into climate-neutral, sustainable and plural ecosystems, encouraging solidarity and critical hope today, tomorrow and during the next billion seconds.

I-am-internet.com

Nâchste Woche Donnerstag 11.11. findet in Düsseldorf ein IndieWebCamp statt. Das Programm startet um 9 Uhr, und endet 15:15. Es ist also eine Kurzfassung von einem ‘normalen’ zweitâgigen IndieWebCamp. Es findet am Tag nach der Beyond Tellerrand Konferenz statt. Beyond Tellerrand ist am 8.11-10.11. Leider habe ich am Nachmittag einen wichtigen Termin in Utrecht, sonst wäre ich gerne nach Düsseldorf gefahren um dabei zu sein. Es ist schon lange her, September 2019, das ich zuletzt an einem IndieWebCamp teilnahm. Das IndieWebCamp Düsseldorf findet in der Zentralbibliothek statt, am Konrad Adenauer Platz. Teilnehmer registrieren sich hier.