The DALL-E imaging algorithm is now available to everyone to play with. Do realise while the entity providing DALL-E is called OpenAI, it is no such thing.

An AI generated color photograph of a 1960s green Volkswagen camper van parked underneath a night sky with the milky way running from front to back, as a commercial airliner with two contrails flies past from left to right

Generated with DALL-E using the prompt “A color photograph of a 1960s green Volkswagen camper van parked underneath a night sky with the milky way running from front to back, as a commercial airliner with two contrails flies past from left to right.”, a single image selected from the first iteration of four.

Stable Diffusion, an open sourced model that can be run on your own hardware, produces this with the same prompt


Generated with Stable Diffusion using the prompt “A color photograph of a 1960s green Volkswagen camper van parked underneath a night sky with the milky way running from front to back, as a commercial airliner with two contrails flies past from left to right.”, a single image selected from the first iteration of four.

I’ve spotted several locations in our neighbourhood where wild hops grow. This one is along the cycling path where Y and I cycle to school. In the mornings last week when the sun was out, it shone directly on a hops plant around the time we pass it. I still need to stop on the way back and smell them. Never have seen them here in the north before, I have encountered them in the hills of Limburg in the south though.

We cycled to school yesterday morning, in between rain showers.
At school Y and I watched the rainbow for a while. A double arch and supernumerary bands inside the primary arch were also visible. It of course did mean, that while Y went inside and stayed dry, I got showered on the way back. Rainbows are light reflected in water droplets after all, and I had to cycle in that direction to return home.

France is a highly centralised country. That also shows in the road signs. Along the motorways you seem to be able to head towards Paris at every junction. E and I often joke about it when en route in France. It turns out to be true off the motorways too. We camped in Gigny-sur-Saône, a vilage of 500 people on the eastern edge of the Bourgogne. We weren’t in the village proper even, but in a hamlet near it. Right outside the campground there was an aging road sign. Pointing to Paris obviously (400km away). And to Lyon (125km). Both pointers aren’t of any practical navigational use for the many narrow countryroads in the region. Every time I spotted the sign when leaving the campground I had to smile.