Amexus is organising a conference on digitisation in the energy sector, and more specifically in the energy transition. Earlier this week I was interviewed at home about the role of open data in energy transition and my work with Dutch provinces on this topic.

The video, in German, has already been made available.

Today my old friend Max interviewed me in our garden. We discussed the role of digitisation in general, and of open data in particular, for the energy transition. This in preparation for the energie.digital conference I will be speaking at in Germany next month. It was a good rehearsal as well, as I will be speaking in German, and I need to work on my German language jargon ­čÖé

Heute hat mein alter Freund Max in unserem Garten ein Video-Interview mit mir gemacht. Im September werde ich auf der von seiner Firma organisierten Konferenz energie.digital sprechen ├╝ber Open Data, und wie offene Daten eine Rolle spielen in der Energiewende.

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Max setting up his equipment, and borrowing some more equipment from Elmine, my in house video professional

The Austrian Open Knowledge Chapter is dissolving itself (link in German), a decision already made at a general assembly in December 2018. Judging by the website activities had petered out in recent years, the blog falling silent at the end of 2017.

Austria over the years has been an active country concerning open government data and open knowledge in general. Specifically I see the Austrian open data community as a globally relevant good practice example, one that I still regularly refer to. Already in 2010, when I spoke at an open data meet-up in Graz, and in subsequent years presenting at OGD Austria conferences and various other events, what stood out to me was the broad scope the Austrian open data community had. Academia, activists, the federal chancellery, state governments, city governments, start-ups, technologists and traditional re-users were all around the same table. Informal get-togethers and resulting relations formed a basis on which more formal structures and cooperative initiatives could grow. I think such a solid community fundament is the key reason Austria was able to achieve a lot on open data in the absence of any legal framework to actively stimulate it, moreover with a constitution that enshrines civil service secrecy.

For a few years I was quite well informed about the Austrian efforts, through regular visits, and regular calls between German speaking community leaders from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and me as the odd one out. Over time my connection grew more distant however.

With Open Knowledge Austria ceasing to exist, a chapter ends. I suspect the community substrate on which it could exist will endure, even if events, individual members lives and contexts are always in flux around us. It is laudable that OK Austria is actively deciding to dissolve. Organisations all too easily stumble into the pitfall that continued existence becomes the organisation’s primary goal. By dissolving, as Stefan Kasberger, OK Austria’s chair, wrote, one releases its hold on specific topics and niches in an ecosystem, and it becomes possible for new things to emerge over time.

Linz, OGD Austria
At the 2012 OGD Austria conference in Linz, a wall at the venue carried the text, near the floor obviously, “Above starts down below”. It seemed a good description of how the Austrian open data efforts were based on solid bottom-up community building to me at the time.

This looks like a very useful work, by over 65 authors and a team of editors including Mor Rubinstein and Tim Davis: The State of Open Data

A little over a decade has passed since open data became a real topic globally and in the EU. I had my first discussions about open data in the spring of 2008, and started my first open data project, for the Dutch Ministry for the Interior, in January 2009. The State of Open Data looks at what has been achieved around the world over that decade since, but also looks forward:

How will open data initiatives respond to new concerns about privacy, inclusion, and artificial intelligence? And what can we learn from the last decade in order to deliver impact where it is most needed? The State of Open Data brings together over 65 authors from around the world to address these questions and to take stock of the real progress made to date across sectors and around the world, uncovering the issues that will shape the future of open data in the years to come.

Over 18 months the authors and editors worked to pull all this material together. That is quite an impressive effort. I look forward to working my way through the various parts in the coming time. Next to the online version African Minds has made a hard copy version available, as well as a free downloadable PDF. That PDF comes in at 594 pages, so don’t expect to take it all in in one sitting.

I freue mich das ich Ende September ├╝ber offene Daten sprechen werde auf der Energie.Digital Konferenz in M├╝nster. Das ist eine gute Gelegenheit unsere Erfahrungen mit offene Daten als Verwaltungsinstrument und als Z├╝ndholz f├╝r die Handlungsf├Ąhigkeit von sehr unterschiedlichen Beteiligten zu teilen. Gerade auch bez├╝glich Energiewende und Stadtwerke, die Themen der Konferenz. Ausserdem kam die Einladung von Max, und wird auch Robert mit dabei sein.