Elmine, in her role as resident WordPress savant, pointed me to MainWP. MainWP is a tool that allows one to manage updates of WordPress and plugins, from a separate single WordPress instance.

That separate single WordPress instance doesn’t need to be online, and can be hosted locally. So I installed it on my laptop. That way there is no attack surface for the outside that would risk allowing access to my 6+ sites that run WordPress.

It turns out, an added benefit is that I can also post to any of those sites from this local instance. This has as an advantage that I can draft postings offline on my laptop, and then push them to a website when done. That should help me write more and with a lower threshold. It has a few drawbacks, as offline I don’t have access to some features I use regularly (post kinds, and more importantly previews).

This post serves as a test, posting from my wordpress instance on localhost.

BredaPhoto

I like the notion of cards, that @visakanv describes, and threading them into a bigger whole.

What would be ideal, I think, is if all information could be represented as “cards”, and all cards could be easily threaded. Every book, every blogpost, every video, even songs, etc – all could be represented as “threaded cards”. Some cards more valuable than others.

In a way, a lot of what I’ve been trying to do with my personal knowledge management, notetaking, etc is to assemble an interesting, coherent, useful thread of thread of threads, of everything I care about. A personal web of data, with interesting trails and paths I can share with others.

I have a huge, sprawling junkyard mess of Workflowy notes, Evernote cards, Google keep cards, Notes, blogposts, etc etc ad infinitum. Buried in there are entire books worth of interesting + useful information. But it suffers from bad or non-existent threading, constrained by memory.

I too have a mountain’s worth of snippets, pieces, half sentences. And I have a much lower stack of postings and extended notes. Interesting stuff doesn’t get shared, because I envision a more extensive, a more ‘complete’ write-up that then more often than not never happens. The appeal to PKM above is key here for me. The world isn’t just cards, I agree with Neil, who pointed me to the posting above, fragmentation isn’t everything. Because synthesis and curation are important. However, having that synthesis in a fully different channel than the ‘cards’ from which it is built, or rather not having the cards in the same place, so that both don’t exist in the same web of meaning seems less logical. It’s also a source of hesitance, a threshold to posting.

BredaPhoto

Synthesis and curation presume smaller pieces, like cards. Everything starts out as miscellaneous, until patterns stand out, as small pieces get loosely joined.
I don’t know why Visakanv talks of threading only in the context of Twitter. Almost like he’s reinventing tags (tags are a key organising instrument for me). To me threading sounds a bit like a trail of breadcrumbs, to show from which elements something was created. Or cooking, where the cards are the list of ingredients, resulting in a dish, and dishes resulting in a dinner or a buffet.

More ‘cards’, snippets, I find a useful take on how to post in this space (both the blog part and the wiki part), and also bring more from other channels/tools in here.

BredaPhoto

(I took the photos during Breda Photo Festival, of Antony Cairns IBM CTY1 project, which is photos printed on IBM punch cards and held together with pins.)

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On my way back to the parking lot after getting a hair cut yesterday, on a whim I walked into the Flehite Museum to see what was on. A nice surprise was the exhibit of 100 works of Engelbert L’Hoëst (1919-2008), a local artist. Colorful expressive work. What spoke to me most were the night views of the sea he made in Portugal. Playing with how the moonlight can set strong accents.

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Three ships, Portugal, 1975

Also a really nice touch were a few facsimiles of diary notes the artist made.

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I don’t have a style, because every moment of life is different again. …. I have always remained seeking.

And, this one that led to my conclusion below.

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It is evening, a dark sky, some light further away. I hear the first tones of a bird starting a song. Again I see the spring nearing in my garden. My studio is full of excitement of what is about to come.

As E and I discussed this over dinner last night, my conclusion was it is really useful and good to share as much of your creative expressions and observations as possible, jot it all down, however trivial they might seem at the moment of making them. It provides glimpses into thoughts, processes, and are of value as such to those near and after you.

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Self portrait of/by Engelbert L’Hoëst, 1957

This is a somewhat worrying development: the entire .org registry of domain names has been sold to a private equity investor. That basically spells out just one way forward, extraction and rent-seeking. As this step immediately follows from ICANN lifting price increase caps in place earlier this year (against the advise of US competition authorities it appears), and the buyer is a newly established entity it seems to have but that purpose.

“Price hikes in 3, 2, 1, ….” seems to be the consensus.

As this site’s domain is part of the .org TLD (when I registered it in the spring of 2003, it was the one non-country TLD ‘zylstra’ was available for), I briefly looked into my options, to defend against price gouging. My domain name renews on May 3rd 2020, in just under 6 months time. I should be able to renew the domain 60 days before it expires, so by early March, in 4 months. Then I will be able to renew for a 5 year period at once. Which, if it precedes a price hike, means I get to buy myself a few years extra before needing to make a decision.

On a more fundamental level, I am surprised that maintaining a TLD domain name registry is entirely left to market forces by ICANN like that. For instance the Dutch national TLD registry is maintained by a non-profit foundation. Whoever runs a TLD registry has a monopoly by default and the costs of leaving for existing domain holders is very substantial. Combining that, monopoly and lock-in, with private investors whose first commandment is not maintaining the general public service that a domains registry (not: registrar) constitutes is worrisome. E.g. this site has been on this domain name for 16.5 years. This domain name is for all intents and purposes my online unique identifier, and I definitely use it as such. Now, for me personally, moving the entire thing isn’t extremely bothersome in itself. It would sadly cause a major chunk of link-rot, but moving it to e.g. zylstra.eu which I also have can be done without much consequence for myself should the costs of zylstra.org rise uncomfortably. It would however also mean moving my de-facto online identity, which is likely to cause confusion in my networks. That identity confusion, and brand damage will be of an entirely different level if you’re a very established NGO, brand or non-profit on a .org domain. E.g. the World Bank, WordPress or Wikipedia, which coincidentally spells WWW, also hosted on .org. Then leaving is much harder, and you’ll likely go with whatever pricing model gets introduced. If only for after a move someone else will pick your old high-recognition domain up for spoofing and phishing most likely, so you’ll stay put whatever the cost.

It smells like something that should be of interest to competition authorities everywhere.

Bookmarked Breaking: Private Equity company acquires .Org registry – Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News (Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News)

Ethos Capital, led by former ABRY Partners Managing Partner, buys .Org registry. I thought this might happen. And now it has. Fresh off ICANN’s blunder letting Public Interest Registry set whatever price it wants for .org domain names, Internet Society (ISOC) has sold the .org registry Public Interest Registry (PIR) to private equity company Ethos …

I had thought I had the language stuff all sorted, also because I had tested it. As it turns out, Google Translate works slightly different than my earlier conclusion.
It does look at the declared language in the <html> tag, but it doesn’t do so exclusively. Even if the language is declared it seems to still also look at the machine learning model.
This has as an effect that when a posting here in Dutch or German is very short, tweet-like, it will still detect that most of the page is in English (navigation structure, sidebar etc.), and treat the entire page as English. This makes even less sense than my earlier notion it follows the declared language, and machine learning if nothing’s declared, as it seems to actively distrust even the little bit of language mark-up it bothers to check in the first place.

It does mean that adding machine translation links at the end of Dutch and German posting is a good service to provide. Here I can’t trust the auto-detect feature of Google Translate (see above), so I must force the correct source language in the link I provide. This doubles the code needed (once for Dutch, once for German), but it works. The code is in the same function I previously adopted from Frank and Jan. I’ve added the translation links only to the RSS-feed, not to the website. My reasoning is that most of my regular readers do so through RSS, and that it’s them that might be interested in also reading my non-English postings.


A posting in Dutch as it appears on the site


The same posting in Dutch as it appears in the RSS feed, with added link to machine translation

For now I’m done with language adaptations. Although, having looked at some of the older conversations concerning multilingualism I’ve had over the years, I also considered how Stephanie Booth adds English excerpts at the start of a posting in French and vice versa. That might be something to emulate. However, it should not clutter up the postings or feeds too much, so likely should be another field. As I’m already using the excerpt field for other things (posting to Twitter and Mastodon mostly), that’s something to figure out in the future.