I’ve read something, so then what?

How and when do I turn what I read into notes, for learning, for retention, for use elsewhere? Having at least some system for this I found is crucial to have somewhere to go with the ideas, associations and thoughts that reading non-fiction creates. I know this because how the absence of a system to take note of my reading feels. For an extended time at some point I did not read any non-fiction simply because I had nowhere to go with the material I learned about, no application, no outlet, and the ideas plus the urge to do something with them kept swirling around in my head creating noisy chaos and frustration.

Having some system is key therefore. What I describe below is my current incarnation of a system, it shifts over time, tools come and go, and therefore it is a snapshot. At the same time my general information strategies and personal knowledge management haven’t fundamentally changed in 20 years. The source of any continuity or consistency is me, not my tools. That said, none of what follows is very strict, it is meant to be forgiving. The source of inconsistency is also me, not my tooling. Not much of it is blind routine. Yet it is way more than doing nothing. My notes create a ratcheting effect, not allowing movement backwards, which is very valuable to me.

Inputs to outputs and the role of friction

Previously I described the flows of various reading inputs to my main tool in working with notes, Obsidian (my entire Obsidian set-up I described in Oct 2000), and the few outputs that flow from them. The image below gives an overview (click for larger version).

The specific steps and tools mentioned in the image are of less importance here. Key is the locus and role of friction in the depicted flows. There is friction in getting material, both source texts and my annotations for them, into my note making tool. This friction I seek to reduce, making it easier to get material to the place where I can work with it. Similarly I’ve reduced friction in getting outputs into the world (my blog, client websites, book lists for instance). Where I don’t seek to reduce friction is in working with notes (expect perhaps for functionality like search), because there friction is the actual work, where the thinking, rewriting, rearranging etc is happening. There is no way around friction there, because it is how I add value to my notes, how I learn and remember things.

The rest of this posting focuses mostly on what happens in the middle section, where the work is, between the inputs and outputs: what do I do there with annotations from what I read?

Web articles via browser

I use a markdown clipper in my browser to save web articles directly as markdown in a folder NewClippings that is part of my notes vault in Obsidian. Usually these come from my feedreading (over 400 individual blogs) or clicking links in those blogs. Saving is not a postponement and promise to self to ‘read later’ which never happens. It is the result of a curation decision, an intentional step, after skimming the web article. I skim looking for suprisal, and I jot down specific reasons for saving it with the web article. This way my future self will know why I was interested in the article originally. Those reasons may be a novel insight in the article, associations I make with other notes I have etc.

Two examples:

Reason: good overview of AI algo’s not doing what we think they’re doing. Types of mistakes made in training models. Rich source of examples. Compare to note [[Relevance of ethics for machine learning 20201219142147]].

Reason: Steps by Chinese gov against BATX’s ANT group. I see this in light of geopolitical positioning w.r.t. digital and data (compare to [[Data is a geopolitical factor 20180419080356]] and to [[Euproposition]]). Also see notes in [[Logic Magazine 7 China]]. Read for notes, not notions. Is there a usable contrast with the EU’s proposition?

I currently have some 825 clippings, of which about 150 are my own old blogposts recycling my earlier writings that way. I do not intend to always process them into other more permanent notes, I don’t treat it as an inbox. It is a repository in its own right, that I can search for additional material. I do pick out clipped webpages for processing, if that is logical from what I’m doing at some point in time.
Whenever I do process an article, it means deleting everything that I don’t think is interesting from my point of view, and summarising and paraphrasing the points I do find interesting. At the top, where the original reason for saving an article is, I keep track of the status of that process. The reworked article remains in the same folder as the other saved articles during this process. If I lift specific notes or notions from the article that can stand on their own, those will link to the original web article by url as source, and end up in one of three notes folders (one for conceptual notes, one for actionable ideas, one for more factual notes and examples) where they are woven into the wider collection by linking. Where that lifting is done I delete the original article from the clippings folder.

Scientific Articles and PDFs via Zotero

I use Zotero to keep a library of scientific articles and other PDFs (e.g. European Commission legal documentation). My motivation for saving them is stored as remark with the material in Zotero. When I save something I usually mention it in my Day logs in my notes, so that I can stumble across it again for processing.
I read those PDFs and highlight and comment in the PDF itself.
Until last week’s Zotero update I could easily grab those highlights and notes using a plugin and save them in markdown into my Obsidian notes vault. The update broke the plugin, so that flow is temporarily out of order. Any highlights and annotations in such a markdown file have a link to the corresponding location in the PDF in Zotero, meaning I can directly jump to the source.

Then, like with web articles I summarise, paraphrase and connect to other notes in steps. Notes/notions that stand on their own, contain the links to Zotero sources. I write, link and fill those stand alone notes from within the annotations first. Once I’ve taken out all I want from an article I delete the annotations note, because all created individual notes link to their source in Zotero. Currently some 10% of learning related notes link to a source in Zotero, after two years of using Zotero.

Books via Kindle

I don’t nearly read the amount of non-fiction I’d like. So none of this is ‘routine’ but it is what has emerged so far as workflow.

When I start reading a non-fiction book, I create a note that serves as the place for thinking and processing what I read. I prefill that note with a template that contains some datafields for my book lists and provide a structure of questions to explore the book before reading. What do I think it is about, what seems the author’s purpose with this book, why am I interested in reading it, what kind of surprisal am I after? What do the different chapters discuss, which ones seem most interesting to me and why? This all before I start reading parts of the book.

While I’m reading I follow two ways of making notes:

  • I make notes alongside reading the book, and put them in the note I created for the book. These are descriptions and summaries of key ideas, but also associations and links to other things, questions that arise while reading. Basically my half of being in dialogue with the book. This is what I’ve done exlusively until recently.
  • Recently I started using the Kindle sync plugin for Obsidian, which grabs all my Kindle highlights and annotations and puts them in a markdown note in my Obsidian vault, including links to the right paragraph in the book. I link that note with annotations to the note I made about the book. I never was a big highlighter / annotator in my e-books because of the difficulty of doing anything with it, but thanks to this plugin removing the barriers I started annotating and highlighting much more intensively.

In the book note that I created before reading I then work through the things I highlighted and annotated. Thinking about connections, contrasts etc, and linking to existing notes accordingly. It is also where I start paraphrasing and writing snippets that can become notes in their own right. The book note is the jumping off point for it. When I’m done with a book, the book note will have the links to the notes it brought forth, and the material that I didn’t in the end use for new notes. I keep the book note, and I keep the note with the highlights and annotations (it would resync from Kindle anyway), so I can always trace a note back to the book note and the location in the book itself.

Handwritten notes

I write some reading notes by hand on my BOOX Nova 2 e-ink device, as well as hand written marginalia, but I don’t have an easy flow bringing those to my notes in Obsidian yet. They are stored as PDFs on my e-ink device, and I need to bring them manually into Zotero, from which there then is a working flow to my notes.
This friction on the input side hinders regular use.

Over the years I’ve filled many note books by hand, not just with reading notes, but also annotations of talks, conversations and any other things I jotted down. Recent notes from the past day(s) I usually go through as needed and transcribe into my digital notes. I add them to my Day Log notes, which then can be a jumping off point to create additional individual notes.
Older notebooks, I have in the past scanned a lot of the key material, and have more recently scanned a few note books entirely. In my digital notes I have created an index file for each scanned notebook, where next to a link to each scanned page there’s a brief description of the content, and perhaps a link to relevant other material. That makes it possible to stumble across those notes in search.

Invitation to share

This post describes how I currently make notes from things that I read or wrote. It is a transcription and adaptation of a presentation I gave on April 3rd to the Micro.blog Readers Republic (video), an informal group of book readers around the world meeting every month for conversation. The question of note taking and learning came up as ‘So you’ve read a book, and then what?’ and a few of us volunteered to show what we do. I’m always interested in how other people organise their work, and I think that requires I also share how I work.

Essentially, this description of how I digest my reading is an invitation to you to write up your modes of working too.

Bookmarked Best Case Contrarians by Robin Hanson

Interesting line of thought about when contriarianism makes sense. I wonder about a connection to counter factual thought experiments as a sorting mechanism for such positions, and about probes and experiments to explore contrarian positions in practice, where the cost of experimentation is low, but the results help see if the contrarian position has merit.

Consider opinions distributed over a continuous parameter, like the chance of rain tomorrow. Averaging over many topics, accuracy is highest at the median, and falls away for other percentile ranks. This is bad news for contrarians, who sit at extreme percentile ranks. If you want to think you are right as a contrarian, you have to think your case is an exception to this overall pattern, due to some unusual feature of you or your situation.

Yet I am often tempted to hold contrarian opinions. In this post I want to describe the best case for being a contrarian.

Robin Hanson

Readwise since last September is testing a reader app in closed beta, and their description and rationale looks very promising. They point to how different inputs (RSS reader, Tweets, PDFs, newsletters, e-books) for reading really shouldn’t need completely separate work flows, and that highlighting, annotating and saving it into your own note making flow is key. They describe how they started looking at reading, by looking what comes after such reading. That sounds good, as it means looking at the thing readers are actually trying to do, for which reading is a means.
They also point to how e-books still haven’t built in any of the affordances digital text can provide, and wanting to address that. Also promising and important: they are not aiming for a social app, but for a local first tool for an individual reader.

I added myself to their waitinglist for when the public beta launches. When I did, I also was asked to take a brief survey about my current information strategies, app use (they asked about Obsidian e.g.), and needs. When they asked about sharing from the reader, I mentioned IndieWeb Micropub, and configurable responses.

I’ve never been a Readwise user, because of their silo’d cloud first approach until now, but I’m going to take a look at their new app when it becomes available. They’ve set my expectations high 😀

This is quite something to read. The Irish data protection authority is where most GDPR complaints against US tech companies like Facebook end up, because the European activities of these companies are registered there. It has been quite clear in the past few years how enormously slow the Irish DPA has been in dealing with those complaints. Up to the point where the other DPA’s complained about it, and up to the point where the European DPA intervened in setting higher fine levels than the Irish DPA suggested when a decision finally was made. Now noyb publishes documents they obtained, that show how the Irish DPA tried to get the other national DPA’s to accept a general guideline they worked out with Facebook in advance. It would allow Facebook to contractually do away with informed consent by adding boiler plate consent to their TOS. This has been the FB defense until now, that there’s a contract between user and FB, which makes consent unnecessary. I’ve seen this elsewhere w.r.t. to transparency and open data in the past as well, where government entities tried to prevent transparency contractually. Contractually circumventing and doing away with general legal requirements isn’t admissable however, yet that is precisely what the Irish DPA attempted to make possible here through a EU DPA Guideline.

Reading this, the noticeable lack of progress by the Irish DPA seems not to be because of limited resources (as has been an issue in other MS), but because it has been actively working to undermine the intent and impact of the GDPR itself. Their response to realising that adtech is not workable under the GDPR seems to be to sabotage the GDPR.

The Irish DPA failed to get other DPA’s to accept a contractual consent bypass, and that is the right and expected outcome. That leaves us with what this says about the Irish DPA, that they attempted it in the first place, to replace their role as regulator with that of lobbyist:

It renders the Irish DPA unfit for purpose.

Gisteravond vond de 3e Nederlandstalige Obsidian meet-up plaats, dit keer met zeven deelnemers. Organisator was Christian. Het was al weer even geleden dat ik de eerste 2 sessies hield. Veel langer geleden dan ik me realiseerde toen ik het tijdens de sessie gisteren opzocht (de eerste was in april, de tweede in juli)

Omdat ik ziek in bed lig deed ik mee zonder camera en geluid. Af en toe liet ik van me horen in de chat van de online meet-up. Enkele voor mij bekende gezichten, zoals Wouter en Willy, en vooral nieuwe. Dat was prettig want zo hoor je nieuwe dingen.

Een paar dingen die me opvielen en in me opkwamen, voor mijn beperkte energie op was, en ik het gesprek verliet:

Ieder van ons heeft een lange geschiedenis met notitie-apps, en uiteindelijk wint volgens mij de toepassing die niet alleen frictie reduceert om dingen op te slaan en met die dingen te werken, maar die ook andere wegen openhoudt en je niet opsluit in het denken van de maker van de tool. Op een gegeven moment ging het over welke plugins we gebruiken, en ook daar hoorde je reserve voor plugins die je ‘opsluiten’ in de tool, d.w.z. die niet alleen functionaliteit toevoegen, maar ook inhoud die vervolgens buiten Obsidian niet toegankelijk is (in de platte tekstfiles waarin je notities zijn opgeslagen). Later las ik dat er een plugin is die dat opsluitend effect expliciet probeert tegen te gaan voor wat Obsidian zelf aan gegevens opslaat: de Obsidian metadata-extractor die de metadata naar je harde schijf schrijft zodat andere applicaties (zoals bijv AlfredApp) er bij kunnen. Hiermee kun je Obsidian directer vanuit andere applicaties aansturen als je wilt.

Digitaal eerst, of niet?

Digitaal of eerst op papier? Dat is een vraag die al vroeg aan bod kwam. Mede naar aanleiding van hoe Wouter Obsidian gebruikt. Hij doet alles eerst op papier, scant die pagina’s (met Genius Scan van Grizzly Labs op zijn telefoon), en maakt bij elke foto een korte index, zodat hij via de zoekfunctie de juiste scans kan vinden. Na de eerste meet-up waarin hij dat ook vertelde, ben ik mijn eigen papieren notitieboeken ook gaan scannen, met mijn CZUR staande scanner, en maak daar eveneens indexes bij. Dit keer werd me duidelijk dat hij dat net iets anders doet dan ik heb gedaan. Ik maak 1 index per notebook met links naar de plaatjes in de vorm “plaatje12 over #opendata en gesprek met XYZ”, Wouter maakt per scan een note met daarin zijn annotaties, zodat je de afbeelding meteen boven die annotaties ziet staan. Dat lijkt me weliswaar eleganter, maar ook meer werk.

Al heb ik zelf een sterke voorkeur in het meteen digitaal maken van mijn notities, is de rol van papier en pen wel degelijk belangrijk. De reden om als het kan digitaal-eerst te werken heeft vooral met de frictie te maken die de latere omzetting naar digitaal nog altijd betekent. Sinds klas 5 van de basisschool houd ik al notitieblokken vol aantekeningen bij. Dat is 4 decennia aan notitieblokken.
Fysiek iets schrijven is anders en levert andere verbindingen op dan tekst tikken op het scherm.
Fysiek omgaan met bestaande notities heeft dat andere effect ook bij mij: ik plak met enige regelmaat een reeks post-its met inhoud uit mijn notes op de muur om beter te snappen wat onderlinge verbanden kunnen zijn, ‘gaten’ te zien. Ik kan dat welisaar ook in tools als Tinderbox visueel doen op mijn scherm, maar het werkt anders omdat ik dan mijn handen niet gebruik, niet voor de muur in mijn kamer heen en weer drentel etc.

We hadden het ook over lezen op papier of digitaal. Ook daar speelt voor mij de wrijving een rol in hoe je aantekeningen later digitaal kunt verwerken. Ik lees vooral digitaal (het is veelal goedkoper en scheelt thuis vooral enorm veel ruimte), maar voor non-fictie is mijn eigenlijke voorkeur papier, vanwege het overzicht dat het biedt op een manier die e-readers nog altijd niet weten te bieden. Op mijn e-ink device, en voor PDFs die ik in Zotero verzamel is dingen in boeken markeren of in de kantlijn schrijven inmiddels naadloos naar mijn notities te krijgen, zodat ik ze daar inhoudelijk kan verwerken. In deze context werd ook het boek Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain van Maryanne Wolf genoemd.

Visueel en tekstgericht

Markdown is een opmaaktaal voor tekst, en Obsidian is een viewer op markdown files, en dus in principe geheel tekstgericht. Je kunt wel plaatjes opnemen maar dat zijn passieve afbeeldingen. Je kunt daarnaast Mermaid diagrammen maken, als manier om in tekst een diagram te definieren.
Tot nu toe was dat weinig nuttig voor me, omdat ik eigenlijk uitsluitend in edit-mode werk, en dan zie je alleen je eigen ruwe tekst, niet de opmaak of het diagram als je die toevoegt. Het is de reden dat veel mensen gelijktijdig de markdown tekst waarin ze werken en het visuele resultaat naast elkaar op hun scherm toonden, maar ik doe dat eigenlijk nooit.
Nu is er sinds kort de Live Preview modus (in beta), waarin je eigenlijk altijd het opgemaakte resultaat van je tekst ziet, totdat je je cursor ergens zet en begint te editen. Dan wordt daar lokaal je orginele markdown zichtbaar. Ik heb nu geen extra muisklikken nodig, en hoef geen extra schermpjes open te hebben om mijn markdown ‘live’ te zien. Dat maakt het weer veel aantrekkelijker voor me om ook visuele elementen in mijn notities (te proberen) te gebruiken.
Een van de deelnemers is een eindexamenkandidaat die de stof deels ook in schetsen en diagrammen vertaalt. Iets visueel maken helpt bij het internaliseren van stof, maar ook bij het naar voren halen van die kennis als je de afbeelding weer ziet. Ingewikkelde complexe dingen laten zich vaak makkelijker in een schets vangen dan in een platte tekst die per definitie lineariteit en hiërarchie suggereert. Tot mijn verrassing gebruikte hij een schetstool die volledig in Obsidian te integreren is, en waarmee je ook zelfs links in een afbeelding naar andere notes kunt opnemen. Die schetstool is Excalidraw, in principe een browsergebaseerde tool. waarvoor iemand een Obsidian plugin heeft gemaakt. Excalidraw is net als Obsidian zelf nog maar anderhalf jaar oud. Daar ga ik zeker mee experimenteren.

In de context van schetsen maken kwam ook The Back of the Napkin van Dan Roam ter sprake, en ik moest zelf ook denken aan sketchnoting en The Sketchnote Handbook van Mike Rohde (alleen al een tof boek omdat ik er in sta 😉 )

Een van de andere deelnemers, Roy Scholten is nadrukkelijk bezig met de rol van visualisatie in het overbrengen van kennis en het helpen bij duiding. Zijn blog Bildung zit vanaf nu in mijn feedreader.

Werk en Privé

Het laatste dat ik even wil aanstippen was een gesprek over of je in je notities werk en privé mengt of juist scheidt, en of je er aparte vaults (losse collecties in Obsidian) voor bijhoudt. Bij mij zit alles op 1 plek, onderscheid maak ik in een folderstructuur zodat dingen over bijvoorbeeld ons huishouden niet staan tussen dingen over een huidig klantproject. Al mijn conceptuele notities zitten wel in één folder, ongeacht het onderwerp, want daar telt de onderlinge (netwerk)verbinding het zwaarst. Mijn folderstructuur is niet thematisch gesplitst maar in aandachtsgebieden in mijn leven (zoals in de Getting Things Done methodiek, en in PARA al zitten mijn projecten allemaal in zo’n aandachtsgebied, anders dan PARA). Voor de genoemde eindexamenkandidaat lag er een splitsing tussen school en de rest, en dat kan ik me goed voorstellen. Je notities voor je eindexamen komen voort uit iets dat je wordt opgelegd, iets vooral buiten je eigen directe interesses of activiteiten. (Tijdens je studie is dat weer net wat anders, daar ontdek je juist welke aspecten je straks in je professie boeiend vindt, dus daar wordt het meer eigen, en minder externe verwachting ondanks de tentamenstructuur). Sommigen doen het net als ik, waar ‘alles’ in het systeem zit. Mijn PKM is deels gebouwd op Getting Things Done en daaruit vloeit die ‘allesomvattendheid’ al voort, maar ook op mijn persoonlijk opvatting dat er weinig verschil is tussen werk en niet-werk voor mij. In die context werd ook gesproken over Kanban of Trello boards voor thuis. Mijn primaire tools voor mijn werk en voor thuis zijn identiek eigenlijk, voor klanten hanteer ik daarnaast meestal andere (die ik grotendeels niet thuis zou willen inzetten, dat is waar). Het thuis hanteren van uit je werk bekende methoden om zo de logistiek thuis te vergemakkelijken, en ruimte te maken voor elkaar lijkt me vooral gezond. Onze eerste verjaardagsconferentie in 2008 ging al hierover.

Dank aan Christian voor het organiseren van deze bijeenkomst, en alle deelnemers voor het delen van hun ervaringen en werkwijzen.

Ook met andere Nederlandstalige Obsidiangebruikers van gedachten wisselen? Die Nederlandstalige Obsidian gebruikers vind je ‘allemaal’ op het Obsidian Discord kanaal #nederlands.