This is definetely a word I’ll remember: data visceralisation.
The term is suggested for data visualization in virtual reality, so that people can better experience differences in data, understand them viscerally.

It is something that I think definitely is useful, not just in virtual reality but also in making data visualisation physical, which I called ‘tangible infographics’ in 2014. You switch the perspective to one or more other senses, thus changing the phenomenological experience, which can yield new insights.

In both, tangible infographics and data visceralisation, the quest is to let people feel the meaning of certain datasets, so they grasp that meaning in a different way than with the more rational parts of their mind. (Hans Rosling’s toilet paper rolls to convey global population developments come to mind too).

Benjamin Lee et al wrote a paper and released a video exploring a number of design probes. I’m not sure I find the video, uhm, a visceral experience, but the experiments are interesting.

They look at 6 experimental probes:

  1. speed (olympic sprint)
  2. distance (olympic long jump)
  3. height (of buildings)
  4. scale (planets in the solar system)
  5. quantities (Hong Kong protest size)
  6. abstract measures (US debt)

The authors point to something that is also true for the examples of 3d printed statistics I mentioned in my old blog post which are much less useful with ‘large numbers’ because the objects would become unwieldy or lose meaning. There is therefore a difference between the first three examples, which are all at human scale, and the other three which aim to convey something that is (much) bigger than us and our everyday sense of our surroundings. That carries additional hurdles to make them ‘visceral’.

(Found in Nathan Yau’s blog FlowingData)

Through my feedreader Jane McConnell tells me she’s started using Obsidian to re-organise her notes into a network of information. She points to a 2001 (!) posting by Thomas Vander Wal, a long time connection of mine, about a model of attraction for information. I’ll have to read that 2001 article by Thomas, and think about what I can use from it (attractors, barriers, patterns and boundaries are important elements in looking at complexity, and feature in my own information strategies as well). Then I realised I hadn’t read anything by Thomas recently, only to find out I was subscribed to the wrong RSS feed. Having fixed that, I stumbled upon his recent posting on his own note taking system and the role of Obsidian in it.

All in all a pattern that suggests I really should add my write-up of using Obsidian for 100 days and contribute it to the distributed conversation.

Bookmarked Home-worker… care-work… self-care. – Maren Deepwell
And that got me thinking about what the equivalent of a fresh snowfall will be for me as a home-worker this winter, as I continue to work through this crisis in the colder, darker months and return to localised lock downs here in Wales, which will restrict all aspects of my life. ...

Maren Deepwell in a blogpost explores a question E and I have been discussing as well. Now the days are getting shorter, and begin outside a lot is less of an option, how are we going to deal with likely lock-down periods? In the spring the lockdown was easier to carry: the weather was generally beautiful and we enjoyed our garden as much as possible. Now life is taking place inside more for the next few months. As usual around early October, I started taking high doses of vitamin D, which for years has been helpful to me. We’ve already made a few improvements in the house to make it more comfortable. Maren Deepwell points to how the Nordics deal with the dark half of the year, and that is a good pointer. One thing we learned from visiting the north of Sweden, as well as Denmark, in the winter months, is the use of lighting and candles. But there’s likely more.

Bookmarked Nifty Trick for Extracting Text Out of Images (CogDogBlog)
Images of text are not useful when all you can do is look at them. How can you get text out of something like this if you need a chunk of it to put to use?

Useful tip by Alan Levine on extracting text from an image:

Upload to Google Drive, and on Google Drive use ‘Open with Google Docs’. Select the text and copy without formatting to your notes / own documents.

Bookmarked Facebook says it may quit Europe over ban on sharing data with US (The Guardian)
Facebook has warned that it may pull out of Europe if the Irish data protection commissioner enforces a ban on sharing data with the US, after a landmark ruling by the European court of justice found in July that there were insufficient safeguards against snooping by US intelligence agencies.

Never issue a threat you’re not really willing to follow up on… FB says it might stop servicing EU citizens because it isn’t allowed to transfer their data to US servers over data protection concerns. To me it would seem good news if the FB data-kraken would withdraw its tentacles. It is also an open admission that they can’t provide their service if it is not tied to adtech and the rage-fed algorithmic timeline built on detailed data collection. Call it, I’d say.

Really interesting step for IRMA: they’re now offering BigBlueButton enabled videoconferencing for meetings where participants have their identities verified.

IRMA is a Dutch mobile app that allows you to share specific aspects of your identity with different parties, relevant to a specific context. For instance if you have to proof you’re over 18 to order an alcoholic beverage, showing your ID is the current norm. But that discloses much more than just your age, as it shows your ID number, full name, date and place of birth etc. IRMA is an app that you can preload with verified identifying aspects, such as your date of birth as registered with the local government’s citizens database, which you can then disclose partially where needed. When ordering a drink, you can show the bartender that you’re ‘over 18’ as verified by your municipality, without having to show your actual date of birth or your full name.

In our pandemic age video conferencing has grown enormously, including for conversations where identity is important. E.g. conversations between patients and doctors, or job interviews, conversations with your bank, exams etc. IRMA-Meet now offers BigBlueButton videocalls from their site, where all participants have been verified on the relevant identity aspects for the call.

Looking forward to hearing user experiences.