Cory Doctorow formulates something that I think can go onto every list of principles organisations I work with formulate for smart cities, as well as the many data ethics discussions I sit in on.

Don’t track people, help people track the environment to feed their decisions. This flipping of perpective fits with what I posted yesterday about Peter Bihr’s approach to smart cities. It also fits with my main irritation at the state of debate about self driving cars, where all is centered on the car itself. Self driving cars will need to tap into a myriad of sensor streams from lamp posts, road pavement, and whatnot.

Cory’s approach provides agency, the standard smart city approaches tend to take it away.

Bookmarked Imagining a “smart city” that treats you as a sensor, not a thing to be sensed | Cory Doctorow’s craphound.com

the idea of an Internet of Things that treats people “as sensors, not things to be sensed” — a world where your devices never share your data with anyone else to get recommendations or advice, but rather, where all the inanimate objects stream data about how busy they are and whether they’re in good repair, and your device taps into those streams and makes private recommendations, without relaying anything about you or your choices to anyone else.

As I’ve often written, the most important thing about technology isn’t what it does, but who it does it to, and who it does it for. The sizzle-reels for “smart cities” always feature a control room where wise technocrats monitor the city and everyone in it — all I’m asking is that we all get a seat in that control room.

Good to see how various strands combine here, apart from the topic which is governance of smart cities. The immediate trigger for Peter Bihr is Toronto’s smart city plan, on his radar as he was recently in Canada. We both were to visit Peter Rukavina’s unconference. He references how back in 2011 we already touched upon most of the key ingredients, at the Cognitive Cities conference in Berlin, which he organised, and where I spoke. And he mentions doing a fellowship on this very topic for the Edgeryders, my favourite community in Europe for these type of issues, and which I try to support where I can.

Read How to plan & govern a smart city? (The Waving Cat)

What does governance mean in a so-called smart city context. What is it that’s being governed and how, and maybe most importantly, by whom?

Some links I thought worth reading the past few days