Boris wrote that iA Writer has support for Micropub now. That sounds interesting, as it would allow me to write locally, and publish to several of my sites, both online and on my local system.

Somehow I can’t get the iA app to talk to my IndieAuth endpoint yet. Not sure what the issue is, but duckduckgo-ing the error message seems to indicate it has to do with some system settings on my laptop?

The resource could not be loaded because the App Transport Security policy requires the use of a secure connection

Using WordPress pages as wiki as I’ve been doing in the past months, has drawbacks of course: no versioning on the page (but it is available in the admin back-end), no easy outlining functionality (changing hierarchies, dragging snippets) for which html lists like <ul><li></li></ul> are only an extremely poor substitute. For the pages on this site, this is less problematic. The pages here are more static content I think. I am noticing it more on my personal WP instance, where I write daily.

At the same time I want to avoid going on a hunt for the ‘best’ tool / set-up, which is why I am trying to not get sucked into the ongoing wave of enthusiasm for Roam. This is why WP is useful at this stage: I am using it already, both online and locally.

In response to Peter’s earlier request I have created a new RSS feed that contains only comments on postings, not other types of reactions such as likes, mentions, and ping- or trackbacks. It was a bit of a puzzle to get it all working, having me dive down the rabbit hole leading to the maze that is the WordPress documentation. With some suggestions from Jan Boddez, I now have a result. The new feed is listed on the right hand side. Subscribe to it if you care to follow conversations on this blog. The feed with all interactions, so including likes etc., is also available.

I documented how I created the feed over in the wiki.

I am trying to add an additional RSS feed, using a different template, to my blog. Most documentation on WordPress.org seems to be aimed at replacing an existing feed, or alter its contents.

The additional feed is meant to fulfill Peter’s request to have a comments feed that shows only real comments, not all the likes, reposts etc I also receive through WebMentions. It is a very logical request, but I also want to keep the original comments RSS feed that includes all interaction with content on this site. So I need to add a new RSS feed.

WordPress.org doesn’t really contain any complete step-by-step explanations for anything, including for adding customised RSS feeds. It also doesn’t have any info on excluding pingbacks from comment feeds, which would be similar to what I’m trying to do. I tried stuff based on snippets of documentation I did find, but couldn’t put those snippets together into a coherent path to a solution.

Then I found a guide at WPBeginner dot com (WP beginner, that’s me, even though I’ve been a WP user and tinkerer since 2004) It’s from 2016 so maybe not concurrent with today’s version of WP. Following their explanation, I added the following to my child theme’s functions.php:

add_action('init', 'extracommentsRSS');
function extracommentsRSS(){
add_feed('commentsdupe', 'extracommentsrssFunc');
}

function extracommentsrssFunc() {
get_template_part('rss2', 'commentsdupe');
}

The first part adds the new feed to WP, the second function tells it where to look for the template for the feed. That template, named rss2-commentsdupe.php, is located within the child-theme folder.

The URL for the feed now works, however it first prompted a download of an empty file due to the template file having a wrong name. With that name corrected (based on Jan’s comments below), it does load the template correctly.

The template itself still has issues (meaning it doesn’t work as intended at all): the while has_comments() loop provides no results, as it does not get passed any variables. Because the get_template_part is not provided with those variables before getting called. Jan suggested adding the query to the template. Did that, but now struggle to find a way to lift the comments from the query result.

The query below gets the latest 20 approved reactions on my site of the type ‘comment’ (as opposed to e.g. pingback or webmention):

$query = new WP_Comment_Query( array( 'status' => 'approve', 'type' => 'comment', 'number' => 20, 'orderby' => 'commentdate_date' ) );

The result if I print it as arrays, contains 7 elements (the query, the query arguments, default query arguments (?), an empty one, an array with the 20 requested WP comment objects, and two more empty ones).
The query works as intended, but now I do not know how a) to access the 5th element, and b) handle the WP comment objects within it. What seems to be intended functions for it (have_comments(), the_comment()) don’t seem to work.

The below code at least does not work. If I test it like this, it never enters the while loop, so never echoes ‘BOE’

while ( $query->have_comments() ) :
echo 'BOE';
$query->the_comment();
$comment_post = get_post( $comment->comment_post_ID );
$GLOBALS['post'] = $comment_post;
?> etc.

After some more suggestions by Jan Boddez, ao that have_comments() doesn’t work for wp_comment_query, I then established that get_comments to query the comments, and then a foreach to loop through them works the way I need it to.

$query = get_comments( array( 'status' => 'approve', 'type' => 'comment', 'number' => 20, 'orderby' => 'commentdate_date' ) );

foreach ($query as $comment):
$comment_post = get_post( $comment->comment_post_ID );
$GLOBALS['post'] = $comment_post;

Once I had that the original feed template could be fully re-used, and now validates:

[Valid RSS]

As I was looking at repurposing my local WP install on my laptop in light of the wiki experiments I mentioned yesterday, I wanted to add the Category to Pages plugin I use on my blog to my local WP instance. Turns out that plugin was closed 18 months ago. I never noticed, as a WordPress install does alert you to plugins that have updates available, but clearly doesn’t warn you if a plugin is no longer being maintained. It seems the developer has closed down all his WordPress activities, with accounts deleted, his domains let go (except for his main one).

I use the Category to Pages plugin on my blog to be able to use Pages as a one-person wiki. The categories provide navigational structure, and make having hub pages easy (through category archives). There is one similar plugin that has been maintained in the past six months, which possibly is a replacement. I would need to check if it can take over seamlessly from the previous plugin, or that I need to recreate the categories and tags for pages that are currently in use. Alternatively, although the old plugin can’t be downloaded anymore, I can copy the old one over to my local WP instance for now. But probably better to have both WP instances use a plugin that is maintained.

Replied to Now supporting Webmention by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
I think? If you know how to send a Webmention, please do so that I know it works!....I’ll need to do some spelunking to figure out how I want to display and style them

Welcome to using WebMention, Jeremy. Still figuring out how to best use it myself with regard to how they get displayed on my site.

Like you I use WordPress, and I would love for mentions to display more like the old pingbacks, where you’d get a snippet from the mentioning site from around where it links to you. Now it mostly is ‘site x mentioned this.’ which makes me click to get a notion if it’s relevant.

On Webmention tweaks I documented some of the things I tried. The issue is that because the tweaks are in the Semantic Linkbacks plugin, not in the WP theme, you can only make those tweaks a permanent option if it gets rolled into the plugin (no such things as a child-plugin like with themes). And I’m not confident enough of my changes to figure out and try submitting them to the maintainers of the plugin.