To me blogs and wikis are the original social software. My blog emerged as a personal knowledge management tool (Harold Jarche is the go-to source for PKM). Knowledge management to me has always been a very people centered, social thing. Learning through distributed conversations, networked learning (George Siemens and Stephen Downesconnectivism). My friend Lilia Efimova did her PhD on it, with our shared blogger network’s conversations as an empirical case. At some point social software morphed into social media, and its original potential and value as informal learning tools was lost in my eyes.

Blogs and wiki’s, they go well together. Blogs as thinking out loud and conversations (also with oneself). Wiki as its accumulated residue. I had a wiki alongside this blog for a very long time (until it succumbed to spam), both a public external one, and a private one. My friend Peter Rukavina still has his wiki Rukapedia alongside his blog. It serves in part as an explainer to his blog readers (e.g. see his wiki entry on me). Boris Mann, also a long time barcamp/blogging connection, runs a wiki which is editable by the public in part.

A year ago I felt the need to accumulate things in a more permanent way next to the timeline like blog. As I am the only one editing such a ‘wiki’, I opted to use WordPress pages for it (but you could open pages up for wider editing with a separate user-role). I added a few plugins for it, e.g. to add categories to pages so I can build menu structures. Kbase in the top menu leads to this wiki-for-just-me, although it doesn’t show all pages it contains (search will surface them though).

Replied to Introduced to infostrats by Neil MatherNeil Mather

So I am very intrigued by Kicks’ mention of the linkage between blogs and wikis. I like the idea of the blog timeline crystallising into a personal wiki over time.

Following digital breadcrumbs over the past 45 minutes in an order I can’t remember but that started with Peter’s blogrolling and included Frank Meeuwsen’s microblog (his regular one‘s here), saw me end up with Jason Kottke’s news letter, whose site’s rss I already track.

His April 13 newsletter is about going back to blogging, in it a range of suggested blogs to follow, and at the bottom a list of links showing the small rise in blogging I’m part of as well, and how we are rediscovering and renewing old habits. Reading a random one of them, down in the comments I find people like Johannes Kleske, who I used to have in my feed reader and thought to have gone silent, but who is still blogging, so now got re-added to the feedreader.

The crumbs are turning into strands, and those strands get rewoven to form the fabric of the social net. Dan Cohen calls it ambient humanity, providing psychological gravity, the notion that you’re hanging out with others, that others are HERE.

We’ve been here before of course, this weaving links as relationship building, and how I think it should take a bit of effort (both those links point back to 2006 postings).

So I’ll add the same photo I used in 2006 as illustration.

What a tangled web we weave.....What a tangled web we weave….. (photo Pandiyan V, cc by nc)