This is definetely a word I’ll remember: data visceralisation.
The term is suggested for data visualization in virtual reality, so that people can better experience differences in data, understand them viscerally.

It is something that I think definitely is useful, not just in virtual reality but also in making data visualisation physical, which I called ‘tangible infographics’ in 2014. You switch the perspective to one or more other senses, thus changing the phenomenological experience, which can yield new insights.

In both, tangible infographics and data visceralisation, the quest is to let people feel the meaning of certain datasets, so they grasp that meaning in a different way than with the more rational parts of their mind. (Hans Rosling’s toilet paper rolls to convey global population developments come to mind too).

Benjamin Lee et al wrote a paper and released a video exploring a number of design probes. I’m not sure I find the video, uhm, a visceral experience, but the experiments are interesting.

They look at 6 experimental probes:

  1. speed (olympic sprint)
  2. distance (olympic long jump)
  3. height (of buildings)
  4. scale (planets in the solar system)
  5. quantities (Hong Kong protest size)
  6. abstract measures (US debt)

The authors point to something that is also true for the examples of 3d printed statistics I mentioned in my old blog post which are much less useful with ‘large numbers’ because the objects would become unwieldy or lose meaning. There is therefore a difference between the first three examples, which are all at human scale, and the other three which aim to convey something that is (much) bigger than us and our everyday sense of our surroundings. That carries additional hurdles to make them ‘visceral’.

(Found in Nathan Yau’s blog FlowingData)

2 reactions on “Data Visceralisation

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