Thank you Chris for pointing out your work on your own blogroll, and how WordPress itself might be of use here.

Adding images is a nice feature. I added faces in my blogroll in 2003, because I generally subscribe to people not sources, and showing them in my blogroll was a nice way to visualise my blogging peer network, and make blogs look more like the social tools they are.


My blogroll in 2003

Bringing that back would be cool. Especially if relying on gravatars where possible.

So if I understand your postings correctly, the Links manager in WordPress also creates a separate OPML file. Now if this OPML file could e.g. be automatically loaded into a microsub server like Yarns, that would be even better. Then it would all be under the same WP roof.

I notice that the Links Manager allows categories and multiple at that, but tags next to categories would be even better. To do ‘Berlin coders into gardening posts this week’ type of searches in a reader. Having all the tags as categories would look cluttered in WP. I have little use for the defined XFN fields, I’d rather have tags that concern various facets of a blogger’s profile (tech, Drupal, infosec, parent, Barcelona, French, Arabic, rock climbing) to enable fast and detailed cross sections of my feeds. Having those tags here would presumably more easily allow me to carry them over into my reader somehow. Basically trying to figure out if WP Links manager could be the source of such data.

In terms of my ideal feedreader lots of the other features could then happen in a microsub/pub client.

One other question to explore: is there a way to bulk load links into the link manager. It is likely easier to build a spreadsheet with all relevant info for my current 200 feeds or so first. Do you add link by link by hand, Chris?

Replied to a post by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich

I’ll see you your blogroll and add in images and descriptions as well! … Perhaps what we really need is to give some love to that Link Manager in core to update it to OPML v2 and add in the rel attributes from XFN microformats to the links?

I have a ‘recent posts’ and ‘recent comments’ section in the sidebar. This seemed to create problems with the processing of webmentions, specifically with Aaron Parecki’s Xray library for grabbing structured info from any URL. It would find an apparently improperly micro-formatted link in the sidebar and take that as the URL of the posting referred to. This would create faulty likes on other people’s sites, which then would send webmentions to the wrong postings.

As recent posts and recent comments are only a navigational aid when you’re looking at things like the front page, search results and archive pages, I looked into if I can show them on those pages only. Because if those sections aren’t present on the pages of individual postings, they cannot cause problems when parsed for structure. This being a WordPress site, of course there’s a plugin for it, Widget Context. I installed it, removed the offending widgets from individual pages, and it looks like the problem has been solved.

Da’s wel een understatement ja, “de interface niet heel fijn in het gebruik”. Die interface is nog ronduit slecht. Zelf Aperture draaien lukt me nog niet, pogingen om het op mijn laptop als localhost te doen gingen mis. Dat zou ik nog prettiger vinden eigenlijk, op localhost, dan in mijn WP database al is dat al beter dan op de server van een ander. Om die reden speel ik ook nog met TinyTinyRSS, die is goed zelf te draaien (straightforward PHP and MySql), en je kunt makkelijk zelf in de code wat klooien. Ik zoek natuurlijk uiteindelijk het schaap met 5 of zelfs meer poten.

Replied to De indieweb leesmap mogelijkheden komen steeds dichterbij by Frank Meeuwsen

…nu blijkt er ook Yarns te zijn, een WordPress plugin te zijn die deze server integreert in je WordPress omgeving. Het is allemaal in beta en de interface vind ik niet heel fijn in gebruik…

Well, that ‘for now’ was rather short lived. Thinking I was updating a plugin, I accidentally pushed the button to update WP itself. So now I’m at WP5 regardless of my original intentions. Quickly installed the classic editor. My site still works it seems, but it might be some of the plugins actually now don’t. Hopefully I’ll be able to sort things out.

Replied to Sticking With WP 4.x For Now by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (Interdependent Thoughts)

With WordPress 5.0 Gutenberg now launched, I think I will wait until the dust settles a little bit. Most of the few plugins I use haven’t been updated to WP5 yet, and some of its authors write how Gutenberg breaks them. For now I’ll stick with WP4…

With WordPress 5.0 Gutenberg now launched, I think I will wait until the dust settles a little bit. I’m not encouraged by Matt’s State of the Word talk, in which he said ‘get deeper into Javascript’. I’d rather not actually. Most of the few plugins I use haven’t been updated to WP5 yet, and some of its authors write how Gutenberg breaks them. Also there’s still some bugs being ironed out. For now I’ll stick with WP4, until I see more confident reviews. Currently, searches for WP alternatives, calling WP’s new course Dreamweaver, quirks, and bugs, do not inspire that confidence. And already earlier this year there was the discussion of the total lack of accessibility efforts.