So, my webmention issues can’t be solved in the theme, as the content isn’t decided there. I need to dig deeper into the semantic-linkback plugin that I use to handle them.

I found out that webmentions are mentioned in full if they are short enough, and that I can set that limit. So I now want to change the way webmentions are stored. To solve my main issue, I need to select x characters around the spot where my site is mentioned, and set the character limit for webmentions to x+1.

Task 1 now complete. My blog declared 16 h-cards, one for each time my name was mentioned as author under the 15 blogposts on my front page, and 1 in the side bar. That last one is the only one I want to have, so I wanted to remove those underneath blogposts.

To do that, I had to create a child theme of the theme I use, Sempress. I created it on my hosting server directly, not through WordPress.

In the original theme I then hunted down the function used to show the author information for each posting, the sempress_posted_on function. This by viewing the various Sempress files in the WordPress internal Themes Editor. Then I copied that over to my child theme, and changed it. I simply removed the bits that turned my name into a link and all the h-card elements declared as classes around it. There’s no need to link to my author page here. I’m the only author, don’t have a profile page, and if you look at the ‘author archive’ it is a list of all the postings on this site.

I also cleaned up my single remaining h-card, adding a “p-note” class so that the blurb becomes part of the h-card, and making sure it lists the e-mail addresses correctly now.

The child theme I created will be useful for changing the way webmentions are presented on my blog as well.

It’s day 2 of the IndieWeb Camp in Nürnberg, which means it’s coding day. There are a few things on my list before I board a train at three thirty back home. None of them are as advanced or grand as the list I made earlier. I learned a lot yesterday, in terms of understanding what happens where when I use indieweb protocols, so I can now see the different layers of the lasagna more clearly.

So for today the plan is:

  • Remove a uid h-card microformat statement from my site template as it is declared multiple times instead of just once
  • Try and fix the authorisation header issue with IndieAuth
  • Work on how Webmentions are presented in this Sempress theme, which I now know is a theming issue, and not a webmention issue

A great effect of spending a day in the same room with 20 or so more geeking inclined others, is you get a lot of examples, tools and services mentioned. And geek is as geek does, I try them out on the spot. Today this helped me become aware that something is wrong on my server with the OAuth authentication I run. I thought that it was working fine, as it is no problem to actually use it, for instance to log in with my own domain name at the IndieWeb wiki. But when interacting with my micropublishing endpoint not all goes well.

Today I noticed that:

  • When I try to post from Micropublish.net, I can log in at micropublish.net, but when I try to post I get an ‘unauthorized’ error
  • When I try to use the Omnibear Firefox add-on it authorises ok, but then endlessly tries to load the list of syndication targets
  • When I use Quill to post, it posts fine, but does not load the list of syndication targets

Those missing syndication targets (now that I understand what they are from todays sessions) was what first caught my eye. Testing the micropublish endpoint on my server myself I got the correct response, but Quill turned out to get ‘unauthorized’ as response for that request, just like micropublish.net got for posting.

The endpoint gives a correct response

In WordPress my IndieAuth plugin has a diagnostic tool, and running that, it turns out an authorisation header is not send out.

Which seems to be causing the problems. Reading in the links provided it seems like with XML-RPC, my hoster is actively blocking that header. [UPDATE: It is not, it’s just not available in the way the server currently runs PHP] Resulting in exactly the same experience as I had with XML-RPC, that it seems to be only half working (namely the ‘safe’ uses work, while the rest fails). There’s a work around, renaming the headers that get send out, and implementing that work-around is a thing for me to do tomorrow. To see if I can get around being unauthorised. [UPDATE: That workaround did not work until now]

A quick test of my blog’s micropub endpoint (there’s a WordPress micropub plugin) . Using Quill to post this. Quill doesn’t support categories, so this should initially end up on the front page. Ultimately want to be able to simply post on the go from mobile through micropub.

Results:

  • It submitted the blogpost ok
  • It made HTML appear as regular text, did not interpret the link I added
  • It added all the tags as one tag
  • It, as expected, did not use categories

Also tried to do the same using Micropublish, but that throws an ‘unauthorized’ error. If it worked, it would however support categories, as well as various microformats, such as replies, like and rsvps. Need to take a look at that error message.

In just over a week I will be joining the Nuremberg IndieWebCamp, together with Frank Meeuwsen. As I said earlier, like Frank, I’m wondering what I could be working on, talking about, or sharing at the event. Especially as the event is set up to not just talk but also build things.

So I went through my blogpostings of the past months that concerned the indie web, and made a list of potential things. They are of varying feasibility and scope, so I can probably strike off quite a few, and should likely go for the most simple one, which could also be re-used as building block for some of the less easy options. The list contains 13 things (does that have a name, a collection of 13 things, like ‘odd dozen’ or something? Yes it does: a baker’s dozen, see comment by Ric below.). They fall into a few categories: webmention related, rss reader related, more conceptual issues, and hardware/software combinations.

  1. Getting WebMention to display the way I want, within the Sempress theme I’m using here. The creator of the theme, Matthias Pfefferle, may be present at the event. Specifically I want to get some proper quotes displayed underneath my postings, and also understand much better what webmention data is stored and where, and how to manipulate it.
  2. Building a growing list of IndieWeb sites by harvesting successful webmentions from my server logs, and publish that in a re-usable (micro-)format (so that you could slowly map the Indieweb over time)
  3. Make it much easier for myself to blog from mobile, or mail to my blog, using the MicroPub protocol, e.g. using the micropublish client.
  4. Dive into the TinyTinyRSS datastructure to better understand. First to be able to add tags to feeds (not articles), as per my wishlist for RSS reader functionality.
  5. Make basic visualisation possible on top of TinyTinyRSS database, as a step to a reading mode based on pattern detection
  6. Allow better search across TinyTinyRSS, full text, to support the reading mode of searching material around specific questions I hold
  7. Adding machine translation to TinyTinyRSS, so I can diversify my reading, and compare original to its translation on a post by post basis
  8. Visualising conversations across blogs, both for understanding the network dynamics involved and for discovery
  9. Digging up my old postings 2003-2005 about my information strategies and re-formulate them for networked agency and 2018
  10. Find a way of displaying content (not just postings, but parts of postings) limited to a specific audience, using IndieAuth.
  11. Formulate my Networked Agency principles, along the lines of the IndieWeb principles, for ‘indietech’ and ‘indiemethods’
  12. Attempt to run FreedomBone on a Raspberry Pi, as it contains a range of tools, including GnuSocial for social networking. (Don’t forget to bring a R Pi for it)
  13. Automatically harvest my Kindle highlights and notes and store them locally in a way I can re-use.

These are the options. Now I need to pick something that is actually doable with my limited coding skills, yet also challenges me to learn/do something new.

I was a bit surprised to see a Dutch title above one of Peter’s blog posts. It referred to the blog of Marco Derksen, that I follow. I think Peter may have found it in the list of blogs I follow (in OPML) that I publish.

Peter read it through machine translation. Reading the posting made me realise I only follow blogs in the languages I can read, but that that is limiting my awareness of what others across Europe and beyond blog about.

So I think I need to extend my existing list of demands for an RSS reader with built-in machine translation. As both Tiny Tiny RSS which I self host and Google translate have API’s that should be possible to turn into a script.

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp Nürnberg - Oct 20-21, 2018 - Nürnberg, Germany
IndieWebCamp Nürnberg 2018 is a gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.

I’ll be driving there with Frank Meeuwsen. Had already registered, but this is a test to see if RSVPing from my own blog works (using webmention, and microformat to state that this is a rsvp). If a reference to me shows up at the mentioned URL, then yes, it worked.

And it did work. Here’s a screenshot of the event page.

I plan to dedicate some learning time in the coming 12 weeks to better understand the protocols that drive the independent web, or IndieWeb. During our STM18 birthday unconference Frank Meeuwsen presented his experiences on the IndieWeb. Frank, Peter and I have formed an impromptu triade to explore the IndieWeb in the past months. In one of his slides Frank conveniently listed the relevant protocols. I’ll plan for 24 hours to explore 6 protocols. Some of them I already understand better than others, so I’ll start with the ones I feel less knowledgeable about.

The ones I want to explore in more detail, in planned order, are:

  • ActivityPub / OStatus, a decentralized networking protocol (as this ties into my Mastodon experiments as well, this comes first)
  • Micropub, publish on your own domain with 3rd party tools
  • Microsub, own your feed-subscriptions (although I already run my own TinyTinyRss instance)
  • Microformats, markup for data, text, people, events (already used on my blog, but curious to see how I can extend that to more types of data)
  • Indieauth, federated login protocol to sign in with your own domain on other services (already active on my blog, but interested in where else I could use it)
  • Webmentions, respond to a blogpost through your own site (already active on my site, but strongly wish to better format and style it on my site)

In the discussions during Smart Stuff That Matters last Friday, I mentioned a longtime demand I have of social media. The ability to on my blog have different levels of access, of presenting content. But not in the shape of having accounts on my site and corresponding overhead, but more fluid like layers of an onion, corresponding to the social distance between me and a specific reader. Where I write an article, that looks different to a random reader, compared to what e.g. Peter or Frank sees. Maybe even mark-up the content in a way that controls how specific parts of a posting are visible or not. We mused if IndieAuth might be useful here as a first step, as it at least spares me from the maintenance of accounts.

When I link to another blog or site that has enabled webmention, my server log should record that it received a 20* response when trying to reach a webmention end point.

Assuming this is indeed in my server log, then it should be possible to have a script that pulls the successful webmentions from the server log. From that a growing list of IndieWeb sites can grow. Especially if you’d share that list, and others do too, so you can compare and detect new additions to the list. An incremental way of mapping the IndieWeb. Might even become a new, indie Technorati of sorts. At the very least it’s a discovery vehicle to find others interested in the distributed web and outside the silos and media sites.

Or does something like that already exist?

Is this why Bridgy can’t find my web address on Twitter and returns an error when I try to post to Twitter from my WordPress blog? Bridgy expects a rel=”me” reference to my site’s URL on both my blog and my Twitter profile. I have that, but the Twitter one is a t.co shortened version and only shows my actual url as title, not as the link. Like rel=”me” href=”https://t.co/OaBGAJ7WV6″ title=”https://zylstra.org/blog”. So no 2-way confirmation of the relationship? [UPDATE It’s a missing www on my site. Tested with indiewebify.me and works now]

I switched the theme of my site to SemPress. It’s a theme that is created to properly support microformats. So I could switch off the Microformats 2 plugin that attempts to do the same as a ‘best effort’ inside other themes. This theme is by the same coder(s) as the plugin. Hopefully this fixes the microformat errors on my side. Next step is looking at the way I display webmentions.