This looks like a very useful work, by over 65 authors and a team of editors including Mor Rubinstein and Tim Davis: The State of Open Data

A little over a decade has passed since open data became a real topic globally and in the EU. I had my first discussions about open data in the spring of 2008, and started my first open data project, for the Dutch Ministry for the Interior, in January 2009. The State of Open Data looks at what has been achieved around the world over that decade since, but also looks forward:

How will open data initiatives respond to new concerns about privacy, inclusion, and artificial intelligence? And what can we learn from the last decade in order to deliver impact where it is most needed? The State of Open Data brings together over 65 authors from around the world to address these questions and to take stock of the real progress made to date across sectors and around the world, uncovering the issues that will shape the future of open data in the years to come.

Over 18 months the authors and editors worked to pull all this material together. That is quite an impressive effort. I look forward to working my way through the various parts in the coming time. Next to the online version African Minds has made a hard copy version available, as well as a free downloadable PDF. That PDF comes in at 594 pages, so don’t expect to take it all in in one sitting.

I freue mich das ich Ende September über offene Daten sprechen werde auf der Energie.Digital Konferenz in Münster. Das ist eine gute Gelegenheit unsere Erfahrungen mit offene Daten als Verwaltungsinstrument und als Zündholz für die Handlungsfähigkeit von sehr unterschiedlichen Beteiligten zu teilen. Gerade auch bezüglich Energiewende und Stadtwerke, die Themen der Konferenz. Ausserdem kam die Einladung von Max, und wird auch Robert mit dabei sein.

Great initiative. My colleague @palinuro sometimes wears a #missingdata hoodie to get this discussed. Dutch example, now solved McGyver-like, is election results per candidate per polling station, which isn’t collected/kept by election council, just aggregates per municipality. See https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2019/05/missing-numbers-the-gaps-in-government-data/

Replied to

A new weblog has been started by Anna Powell-Smith, called Missing Numbers:

Missing Numbers is a blog about the data that the government should collect and measure in the UK, but doesn’t.

I expect that whatever she finds in missing data within the UK public sector, similar or matching examples can be found in other countries, such as here in the Netherlands.

One such Dutch example are the election results per candidate per polling station. The election council (Kiesraad) that certifies election results only needs the aggregated results per municipality, and that is what it keeps track of. Local governments of course have this data immediately after counting the votes, but after providing that data to the Kiesraad their role is finished.

The Open State Foundation (disclosure: I’m its current chairman of the board) in recent years has worked towards ensuring results per polling station are available as open data. In the recent provincial and water authority elections the Minister for the Interior called upon municipalities to publish these results as machine readable data. About 25% complied, the other data files were requested by the Open State Foundation in collaboration with national media to get to a complete data set. This way for the first time, this data now exists as a national data set, and is available to the public.

Viz of all polling station results of the recent elections by the Volkskrant national paper

Added Missing Numbers to my feedreader.

The Netherlands has the lushest and tastiest grass in the world according to discerning geese, and millions flock to Dutch fields because of it. Farmers rather use the grass for their dairy cows, and don’t like the damage the geese cause to their fields. To reduce damage geese are scared away, their nests spiked, and hunted. Each year some 80.000 geese are shot in the Province South-Holland alone. The issue is that the Dutch don’t eat much wild goose, and hunters don’t like to hunt if they know the game won’t be eaten. The role of the provincial government in the case of these geese is that they compensate farmers for damage to their fields.

20190414 005 Cadzand, Grote Canadese gans
“All your base belong to us…”, Canada geese in a Dutch field (photo Jac Janssen, CC-BY)

In our open data work with the Province South-Holland we’re looking for opportunities where data can be used to increase the agency of both the province itself and external stakeholders. Part of that is talking to those stakeholders to better understand their work, the things they struggle with, and how that relates to the policy aims of the province.

So a few days ago, my colleague Rik and I met up on a farm outside Leiden, in the midst of those grass fields that the geese love, with several hunters, a civil servant, and the CEO of Hollands Wild that sells game meat to both restaurants and retail. We discussed the particular issues of hunting geese (and inspected some recently shot ones), the effort of dressing game, and the difficulties of cultivating demand for geese. Although a goose fetches a hunter just 25 cents, butchering geese is very intensive and not automated, which means that consumable meat is very expensive. Too expensive for low end use (e.g. in pet food), and even for high end use where it needs to compete with much more popular types of game, such as hare, venison and wild duck. We tasted some marinated raw goose meat and goose carpaccio. Data isn’t needed to improve communication between stakeholders on the production side (unless there emerges a market for fresh game, in contrast to the current distribution of only frozen products), but might play a role in the distribution part of the supply chain.

Today with the little one I sought out a local shop that carries Hollands Wild’s products. I bought some goose meat, and tonight we enjoyed some cold smoked goose. One goose down, 79.999 to go.

20190503_104336

20190503_104402