Great initiative. My colleague @palinuro sometimes wears a #missingdata hoodie to get this discussed. Dutch example, now solved McGyver-like, is election results per candidate per polling station, which isn’t collected/kept by election council, just aggregates per municipality. See https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2019/05/missing-numbers-the-gaps-in-government-data/

Replied to

A new weblog has been started by Anna Powell-Smith, called Missing Numbers:

Missing Numbers is a blog about the data that the government should collect and measure in the UK, but doesn’t.

I expect that whatever she finds in missing data within the UK public sector, similar or matching examples can be found in other countries, such as here in the Netherlands.

One such Dutch example are the election results per candidate per polling station. The election council (Kiesraad) that certifies election results only needs the aggregated results per municipality, and that is what it keeps track of. Local governments of course have this data immediately after counting the votes, but after providing that data to the Kiesraad their role is finished.

The Open State Foundation (disclosure: I’m its current chairman of the board) in recent years has worked towards ensuring results per polling station are available as open data. In the recent provincial and water authority elections the Minister for the Interior called upon municipalities to publish these results as machine readable data. About 25% complied, the other data files were requested by the Open State Foundation in collaboration with national media to get to a complete data set. This way for the first time, this data now exists as a national data set, and is available to the public.

Viz of all polling station results of the recent elections by the Volkskrant national paper

Added Missing Numbers to my feedreader.

The Netherlands has the lushest and tastiest grass in the world according to discerning geese, and millions flock to Dutch fields because of it. Farmers rather use the grass for their dairy cows, and don’t like the damage the geese cause to their fields. To reduce damage geese are scared away, their nests spiked, and hunted. Each year some 80.000 geese are shot in the Province South-Holland alone. The issue is that the Dutch don’t eat much wild goose, and hunters don’t like to hunt if they know the game won’t be eaten. The role of the provincial government in the case of these geese is that they compensate farmers for damage to their fields.

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“All your base belong to us…”, Canada geese in a Dutch field (photo Jac Janssen, CC-BY)

In our open data work with the Province South-Holland we’re looking for opportunities where data can be used to increase the agency of both the province itself and external stakeholders. Part of that is talking to those stakeholders to better understand their work, the things they struggle with, and how that relates to the policy aims of the province.

So a few days ago, my colleague Rik and I met up on a farm outside Leiden, in the midst of those grass fields that the geese love, with several hunters, a civil servant, and the CEO of Hollands Wild that sells game meat to both restaurants and retail. We discussed the particular issues of hunting geese (and inspected some recently shot ones), the effort of dressing game, and the difficulties of cultivating demand for geese. Although a goose fetches a hunter just 25 cents, butchering geese is very intensive and not automated, which means that consumable meat is very expensive. Too expensive for low end use (e.g. in pet food), and even for high end use where it needs to compete with much more popular types of game, such as hare, venison and wild duck. We tasted some marinated raw goose meat and goose carpaccio. Data isn’t needed to improve communication between stakeholders on the production side (unless there emerges a market for fresh game, in contrast to the current distribution of only frozen products), but might play a role in the distribution part of the supply chain.

Today with the little one I sought out a local shop that carries Hollands Wild’s products. I bought some goose meat, and tonight we enjoyed some cold smoked goose. One goose down, 79.999 to go.

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Open Nederland heeft een eerste podcast geproduceerd. Sebastiaan ter Burg is de gastheer en Maarten Brinkerink deed de productie en muziek.

In de Open Nederland podcast komen mensen aan het woord komen die kennis en creativiteit delen om een eerlijke, toegankelijke en innovatieve wereld te bouwen. In deze eerste aflevering gaat het over open in verschillende domeinen, zoals open overheid en open onderwijs, en hoe deze op elkaar aansluiten.

De gasten in deze aflevering zijn:

  • Wilma Haan, algemeen directeur van de Open State Foundation,
  • Jan-Bart de Vreede, domeinmanager leermiddelen en metadata van Kennisnet en
  • Maarten Zeinstra van Vereniging Open Nederland en Chapter Lead van Creative Commons Nederland.

(full disclosure: ik ben zowel bestuurslid van Open Nederland als bestuursvoorzitter van Open State Foundation, waarvan CEO Wilma Haan in deze podcast deelneemt.)

Where German Easter fires burn on Saturday evening, Dutch Easter fires burn on Easter Sunday. So this Easter Monday morning it’s time to look at the second spike of PM10 pollution in the air. The smell in the garden is as strong as yesterday.

The sensor grid shows a much more muted picture this morning. First the same sensors as I looked at yesterday.

Ter Apel (on the German border, have their own fire on Sunday evening, had an extreme reading after the German fires), shows twice the norm. Still a high outlier, but it pales in comparison to the 5 times the norm reading a day earlier. The peak also dissipates more quickly.

Upwind from us, in the Flevo polders, it is a similar picture, a less distinct peak than yesterday but still well above twice the norm.

And near us in Utrecht the readings are actually about the same as yesterday. That matches with my perception that the smell around our house is about the same as yesterday. It also implies that though yesterdays fires were much closer, they were perhaps less in numbers (some were cancelled due to drought) or intensity, or they weren’t actually as neatly upwind from us as the German fires and passed to the south of us.

The latter seems to be borne out by readings from some of the other sensors.
First Eibergen, on the border between the Twente and Achterhoek regions, an area with lots of Easter fires.

Eibergen shows a higher peak due to the Sunday fires than the day before, yet both peaks are in the same range at 2 to 2.5 times the norm.

South and east of the region we see similar patterns.
In Nijmegen more southern, the peak is higher than the day before, because they were not downwind of many German fires.

On the Veluwe, which is more eastern and closer to us, the peak is again lower than the day before yet still distinct.

Overall the pollution of Sunday’s fires is less visible across the Netherlands. Where Saturday’s fires made sensors go into the red from the north-eastern border, southwesterly across the country to Amsterdam, for Sunday’s fires such a clear corridor doesn’t show.

It’s only morning on Easter Sunday, but apparently in Germany, over 160 kilometers away, Easter fires have been burning on Saturday evening. This morning we woke up to a distinct smell of burning outside (and not just of the wood burning type of smell, also plastics). Dutch Easter fires usually burn on Easter Sunday, not the evening before. So we looked up if there had been a nearby fire, but no, it’s Easter fires from far away.

The national air quality sensor grid documents the spike in airborne particles clearly.
First a sensor near where E’s parents live, on the border with Germany.

A clear PM10 spike starts on Saturday evening, and keeps going throughout the night. It tops out at well over 200 microgram per cubic meter of air at 6 am this morning, or over 5 times the annual average norm deemed acceptable.

The second graph below is on a busy road in Utrecht, about 20 mins from here, and 180 kilometers from the previous sensor. The spike starts during the night, when the wind has finally blown the smoke here, and is at just over 80 microgram per cubic meter of air at 8 am, or double the annual average norm deemed acceptable.

This likely isn’t the peak value yet, as a sensor reading upwind from us shows readings still rising at 9 am:

On a map the sensor points show how the smoke is coming from the north east. The red dot at the top right is Ter Apel, the first sensor reading shown above, the other red points moving west and south have their peaks later or are still showing a rise in PM10 values.

The German website luftdaten.info also shows nicely how the smoke from the north eastern part of Germany, between Oldenburg and the border with the Netherlands is moving across the Netherlands.

The wind isn’t going to change much, so tomorrow the smell will likely be worse, as by then all the Easter fires from Twente will have burnt as well, adding their emissions to the mix.