Via Jeremy Keith, I came across this fun short SF story on blockchain and car based AIs breaking up marriages across the Nordic for profit by matchmaking their rides. One woman takes it out on the DAO and the car that broke her marriage or ‘wedblock’. After reading bought the existing 4 novels by the Finnish author Hannu Rajaniemi for summer reading.

I’m at FOSS4G-NL today, the Dutch annual meet-up of the FOSS4G community. This morning I gave the opening keynote titled “A map is the greatest of all epic poems“, and talked about how data is a matter of geopolitics and ethics by design, even if you’re a geo-data pro somewhere in a small municipality working on some hyperlocal data set. The invitation came as a result of my keynote at the global FOSS4G conference in Germany 2 years ago. Slides in Dutch can be downloaded at tzyl.eu/foss4gnl. Will post a transcript in English later.

Dave wants his old blog back he wrote last year and referenced today in his rss feed, which I totally get.

….I want my old blog back. I liked the freedom. My ideas flowed better.
You know some of blogging is about writing for other people, but I also write to organize my thinking. Scattering things all over the place makes me disorganized. I want it help me focus, to factor my thinking.

This exactly is what made me ditch FB last fall. It worked, and sharply increased my writing, sharing and curiosity.

Is this why Bridgy can’t find my web address on Twitter and returns an error when I try to post to Twitter from my WordPress blog? Bridgy expects a rel=”me” reference to my site’s URL on both my blog and my Twitter profile. I have that, but the Twitter one is a t.co shortened version and only shows my actual url as title, not as the link. Like rel=”me” href=”https://t.co/OaBGAJ7WV6″ title=”https://zylstra.org/blog”. So no 2-way confirmation of the relationship? [UPDATE It’s a missing www on my site. Tested with indiewebify.me and works now]

Today 100 households in Amersfoort turn their gardens into a stage for in total 300 performances. Two blocks down our road a few neighbours opened up their garden too. Turns out they were both actually part of the band programmed to play there. They played in their own garden 🙂

struinen in de tuinen

Great weather, good opportunity to meet some neighbours for the first time.

I switched the theme of my site to SemPress. It’s a theme that is created to properly support microformats. So I could switch off the Microformats 2 plugin that attempts to do the same as a ‘best effort’ inside other themes. This theme is by the same coder(s) as the plugin. Hopefully this fixes the microformat errors on my side. Next step is looking at the way I display webmentions.

Forgotten Literature

There’s a book on the window sill, next to the balcony. One can easily imagine someone reading in the open window while enjoying the sun, then putting the book down to answer the door for a friend passing by who invited the reader to a drink outside on a terrace. Returning home later in the evening, the reader closed the windows and drew the curtains. The book forgotten on the sill. Maybe if the reader wakes up, sometime after we finish our morning coffee on the terrace across the street, and opens the curtains and windows, the book will be found.

(Amersfoort city center this morning)

A few months ago I added an OPML export of all my feeds manually to the sidebar as Blogroll. This week I installed an instance of TinyTinyRSS, to see if I can take it closer to my ideal feedreader. TinyTinyRSS provides a public URL of all the feeds as OPML. So now that link is my automatically updated OPML blogroll in the sidebar. (As long as I keep my TinyTinyRSS reader in sync with my offline reader)

Peter’s Drupal site and my WordPress site don’t deal well with pingbacks. His doesn’t reliably send them, mine doesn’t listen as the endpoint (xmlrpc) is blocked by my hoster for security reasons. My site does process Webmentions. I came across Webmention.io, and it has an option to set my pingback ‘antenna’ to their server, which then transmogrifies and forwards it to my site’s webmention endpoint. This way pingbacks are dealt with on my end like webmentions, circumventing the trouble with my xmlrpc. I replaced the pingback url in my website’s section, by hand, which is not a sustainable option and likely only works until the next update of my WordPress theme. However the WordPress documentation is very silent on where in the database or back-end files I could change the pingback url as part of the bloginfo() settings function, and I can’t find it in the WordPress database or files.

Hey Brad, discovery is why I started publishing the feeds I read as opml for others to explore, and some I read do so too. In 2005 I used to have photos of blog authors I read. Do you publish your feed list somewhere? Tom Critchlow also shows all the content of the feeds he follows on his site. Works well as a discovery mechanism too I found. Maybe I’ll start doing that as well from my TinyTinyRSS instance I installed earlier this week.