This is a handy little webclipper that grabs a page and downloads it in markdown. Just yesterday evening I thought about making something that simply grabs the content of a page and stores it to an inbox folder on my laptop. So I don’t have to copy paste things myself. But it already exists. The clipper has settings so you can add things like the URL you clip from is incorporated in the saved markdown file.

This morning I watched parts of Andy Matuschak’s stream that shows him working on processing his thoughts and notes from a book he read.
It’s about 100 minutes of seeing him making notes….

There is much value in getting an insight in how other people actually do their work (the master-apprentice model is important for a reason), and it is not often you get to see how knowledge workers organise and do the things they do. It’s why I e.g. documented the way I currently use Obsidian for my PKM system. As a resource for my future self, and as a way to offer others a glimpse so they may take some part of it that fits with their own practices.

Andy Matuschak basically took the idea of live streaming your gaming adventures, to live stream a note taking session. And it’s highly fascinating. Because it shows it is actual work that takes time and energy, digesting a book, following lines of thought, doubling back, referencing earlier material, looking things up in the book in question etc. Also of interest is he is focusing on the tensions that what he read causes with other things he knows and has read. He’s not just lifting things out that chime with him, but the things that cause friction. Because in that friction lies the potential of learning.

I had come across this video earlier already this summer, and then only watched the first few minutes. Then I was expecting something else, that the video would show his set-up. I didn’t have time to watch someone go through their actual process. Now I re-encountered it in a different context and the video made much more sense this time 🙂

Browsing through Andy Matuschak’s public Digital Garden is also interesting to do.

Bookmarked IndieWeb Dissertation available as PDF and HTML by Jack JamiesonJack Jamieson (jackjamieson.net)
I recently defended my dissertation and have completed my PhD. It’s titled Independent Together: Building and Maintaining Values in a Distributed Web Infrastructure, and investigates the role of values in the construction and maintenance of the IndieWeb.

Jack Jamieson did his PhD on the IndieWeb community, and he now made his dissertation available in HTML and PDF. Uploaded to my e-reader.

As we’ll be spending a lot of dark winter days inside because of pandemic lock-down measures, we bought the most traditional Dutch family pastime, a sjoelbak, shuffleboard in English. When I grew up this was what we did on New Year’s Eve.

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An unpacked image of our sjoelbak can be seen here on E’s blog.

Today in a conversation at the IndieWebCamp East 2020 someone mentioned the book Ergodicity by Luca Dellanna. I haven’t decided yet if I would want to read the book, but one thing did stand out: the book is not just available in various e-book formats, but also as a Roam-research graph. This means it’s available as JSON data file, where various parts of the book’s content are interlinked. This allows you to non-linearly explore the book.

This allows you to load the book directly into your note taking environment. If you use Roam research.
I myself wouldn’t want to load someone else’s book sized content directly into my own collection of Notions. Only stuff in my own words goes in there. But I do think it would be a great experience to go through an entire book like that. So I am curious to do something like that, separate from my own vault of notes.

Dellanne claims to have invented the future of e-books, with roam-books, but of course there’s a long history of book hypertexts where links are a key part of the content and experience (Victory Garden an early hypertext novel was published in 1987). Eastgate’s tool Tinderbox also allows multiple types of visualisation to let you navigate through (and automatically manipulate) a chunk of content, and it too is saved and shareable in a XML format. Then again, a Roam-book could be a website just as much, except for the graph view.

He’s now also sending out a newsletter published as a Roam-research file. I can see the appeal, with things like block transclusion and graphical representation. In Obsidian doing something like that would be a collection of small interlinked text files. Which basically is a …. website… you would send in the mail. As both Roam and Obsidian are only viewers. So that might be something, offer a newsletter in e-mail format, as a pdf or as a interlinked collection of notes. Different formats for different viewers. The added benefit is that loading a newsletter into your note-taking tool means you can immediately put it through your own summarisation / processing, throwing out the things you’re not interested in, basing additional stuff on the things you are interested in. Another benefit is that if you use generic link titles (e.g. things like [[Indieweb]]) the newsletter will automatically link to your own mention of that term (and to previous mentions of it in earlier editions of the newsletter). I don’t want to load another project on Frank‘s plate, but it sure does sound like something he might be interested in exploring.

I’m participating in the IndieWebCamp East 2020. It’s nominally held on US East Coast, but as everything else, it’s online. The 6 hr time difference makes it doable to take in at least part of it.

Day 1 started with two cool talks. The second talk was by Sarah Hibner about Variable Fonts. Her talk explains it all very well, so do scroll through her talk. In brief variable fonts are a single font file that contains all varieties of a font (whereas normally you’d load regular, italic, bold separately), and also allows custom varieties. That last bit, custom varieties, is where a bit of magic is, because you can have shape shifting font, and it will all be just one font file. An animated galloping horse was shown, and it is actually a font, where each of the ‘frames’ is a variant within the font. I don’t have a use case for this, but it did look like a lot of fun and rather hypnotising!