This morning I wrote my 300th notion, the term I use for my permanent notes (it was on how the societal impacts of novel infrastructures change the scope and paths of your empathy). These notions I started writing from July 8th, so it took about two months. I hadn’t written almost any in the past week or two, and that felt uncomfortable. Thinking about it I realised I wasn’t going through my old presentations as much anymore, and just picking a presentation from the list helped me get back into it. Regularly those presentations contain 1 idea per slide, so they are a rich source. A second much used source are my existing blog posts. Each day I look at which postings I created on this date in the previous 17 years of this blog.

These first 300 notions are mostly my notions, the things that are core to my thinking about my own work, and the things I internalised over the past 25 years or so, of doing that work. Likely there will be a point where I’ve worked through most of my existing material, and new notions will come more from reading novel material, reading other people’s material. This will take more effort I expect, because I’d need to digest my reading and think about it before lifting out the bits I want to keep. That’s different from what is now basically transcribing my slides or my old blogposts. Likely it will need a slightly different process, with more notes in the process of turning into notions in parallel.

Via Roland Tanglao I came across Greg Wilson’s posting on making governance discoverable and providing basic documentation, of a community of contributors to open source projects. It coincides with discussing documenting precisely such key and elemental things for my company, to have a better on-ramp for new team members as well as provide colleagues with better agency to do things themselves. It also reminds me of how Basecamp documents and describes their preferred modes of communication (asynchronous long form being the default), and it triggered some ideas on how to better engage the existing community and new networks around the NGO I chair.