I have installed AutoGPT and started playing with it. AutoGPT is a locally installed and run piece of software (in a terminal window) that you theoretically can set a result to achieve and then let run to achieve it. It’s experimental so it is good advice to actually follow its steps along and approve individual actions it suggests doing.
It interacts with different generative AI tools (through your own API keys) and can initiate different actions, including online searches as well as spawning new interactions with LLM’s like GPT4 and using the results in its ongoing process. It chains these prompts and interactions together to get to a result (‘prompt chaining’).

I had to tweak some of the script a little bit (it calls python and pip but it needs to call python3 and pip3 on my machine) but then it works.

Initially I have it set up with OpenAI’s API, as the online guide I found were using that. However in the settings file I noticed I can also choose to use other LLM’s like the publicly available models through Huggingface, as well as image generating AIs.

I first attempted to let it write scripts to interact with the hypothes.is API. It ended up in a loop about needing to read the API documentation but not finding it. At that time I did not yet provide my own interventions (such as supplying the link to the API documentation). When I did so later it couldn’t come up with next steps, or not ingesting the full API documentation (only the first few lines) which also led to empty next steps.

Then I tried a simpler thing: give me a list of all email addresses of the people in my company.
It did a google search for my company’s website, and then looked at it. The site is in Dutch which it didn’t notice, and it concluded there wasn’t a page listing our team. I then provided it with the link to the team’s page, and it did parse that correctly ending up with a list of email addresses saved to file, while also neatly summarising what we do and what our expertise is.
While this second experiment was successfully concluded, it did require my own intervention, and the set task was relatively simple (scrape something from this here webpage). This was of limited usefulness, although it did require less time than me doing it myself. It points to the need of having a pretty clear picture of what one wants to achieve and how to achieve it, so you can provide feedback and input at the right steps in the process.

As with other generative AI tools, doing the right prompting is key, and the burden of learning effective prompting lies with the human tool user, the tool itself does not provide any guidance in this.

I appreciate it’s an early effort, but I can’t reproduce the enthusiastic results others claim. My first estimation is that those claims I’ve seen are based on hypothetical things used as prompts and then being enthusiastic about the plausible outcomes. Whereas if you try an actual issue where you know the desired result it easily falls flat. Similar to how ChatGPT can provide plausible texts except when the prompter knows what good quality output looks like for a given prompt.

It is tempting to play with this thing nevertheless, because of its positioning as a personal tool, as potential step to what I dubbed narrow band digital personal assistants earlier. I will continue to explore, first by latching onto the APIs of more open models for generative AI than OpenAI’s.

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