It’s only morning on Easter Sunday, but apparently in Germany, over 160 kilometers away, Easter fires have been burning on Saturday evening. This morning we woke up to a distinct smell of burning outside (and not just of the wood burning type of smell, also plastics). Dutch Easter fires usually burn on Easter Sunday, not the evening before. So we looked up if there had been a nearby fire, but no, it’s Easter fires from far away.

The national air quality sensor grid documents the spike in airborne particles clearly.
First a sensor near where E’s parents live, on the border with Germany.

A clear PM10 spike starts on Saturday evening, and keeps going throughout the night. It tops out at well over 200 microgram per cubic meter of air at 6 am this morning, or over 5 times the annual average norm deemed acceptable.

The second graph below is on a busy road in Utrecht, about 20 mins from here, and 180 kilometers from the previous sensor. The spike starts during the night, when the wind has finally blown the smoke here, and is at just over 80 microgram per cubic meter of air at 8 am, or double the annual average norm deemed acceptable.

This likely isn’t the peak value yet, as a sensor reading upwind from us shows readings still rising at 9 am:

On a map the sensor points show how the smoke is coming from the north east. The red dot at the top right is Ter Apel, the first sensor reading shown above, the other red points moving west and south have their peaks later or are still showing a rise in PM10 values.

The German website luftdaten.info also shows nicely how the smoke from the north eastern part of Germany, between Oldenburg and the border with the Netherlands is moving across the Netherlands.

The wind isn’t going to change much, so tomorrow the smell will likely be worse, as by then all the Easter fires from Twente will have burnt as well, adding their emissions to the mix.

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