Today I had a bit of time to try running Mastodon on Raspberry Pi again. Last week I got stuck as some of the mentioned dependencies in the Mastodon installation guide could not be installed. As the step where I got stuck deals with a different Linux version, I tried simply skipping to the next step.

From the linked guide the steps ubuntu dependencies, node.js repository, yarn repository did not work.
The step after that, for various other dependencies, works again (which includes yarn actually).
Then a few steps follow that need to be executed as the specific user for mastodon. Installing ruby and node.js works fine, and almost all steps to install ruby and node.js dependencies. The final 2 steps of the dependencies throw errors (bundle install and yarn install). As at least some parts of the bundle install command do get executed, but not all. These are the last two steps before actually getting into configuring the installation, so it feels like being nearly there.

I’d have to dive deeply into the logfiles to see what wasn’t installed and what is missing. Not sure if I will easily find time to do so, and if I would actually understand what the log files tell me. It is also unclear if there is a relationship with the three steps I have skipped earlier in the process as they didn’t work.

One reaction on “Running Mastodon Myself, an Experiment Pt3

  1. As I didn’t succeed yet in getting Mastodon to run on a Raspberry Pi, nor in running a Gnu Social instance that actually federates on my hosting package, I’ve opted for an intermediate solution to running my own Mastodon instance.
    Key in all this is satisfying three dimensions: control, flexibility and ease of use. My earlier attempts satisfy the control and flexibility dimensions, but as I have a hard time getting them to work, do not satisfy the ease of use dimension yet.
    At the same time I did not want to keep using Mastodon on a generic server much longer, as it builds up a history there which with every conversation ups the cost of leaving.
    The logical end point of the distributed web and federated services is running your own individual instance. Much as in the way I run my own blog, I want my own Mastodon instance.
    Such an individual instance needs to be within my own scope of control. This means having it at a domain I own. and being able to move everything to a different server at will.
    There is a hoster, Masto.host run by Hugo Gameiro, who provides Mastodon hosting as a monthly subscription. As it allows me to use my own domain name, and provides me with admin privileges of the mastodon instance, this is a workable solution. When I succeed in getting my own instance of Mastodon running on the Rapsberry Pi, I can simply move the entire instance at Masto.host to it.
    Working with Hugo at Masto.host was straightforward. After registering for the service, Hugo got in touch with me to ensure the DNS settings on my own domain were correct, and briefly afterwards everything was up and running.
    Frank Meeuwsen, who started using Masto.host last month, kindly wrote up a ‘moving your mastodon account’ guide in his blog (in Dutch). I followed (most) of that, to ensure a smooth transition.
    Using Mastodon? Do follow me at https://m.tzyl.nl/@ton.

    Screenshots of my old Mastodon.cloud account, and my new one on my own domain. And the goodbye and hello world messages from both.

    share 
    share 
    share 
    tweet 
    share 
    e-mail 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.