Tuesday will see the presentation of the new Dutch national budget, during the traditional opening of the parliamentary year, ‘Prince’s Day‘.

58% (153 out of 262 billion Euro) of the budget is allocated to social affairs (78 billion Euro), and healthcare (75 billion Euro). These two largest domains are also the two least transparant ones. For both domains little to none exists in terms of meaningful open data.

On the contrary both domains are notorious for their opaqueness. In the social domain a massive decentralization has transferred billions to lower levels of government, making the way they are spent invisible to both Parliament and the High Court of Audit. In healthcare insurers and hospitals are fighting the Minister tooth and nail over disclosing even basic numbers they are legally bound to make public, and freedom of information requests end up in court.

The budget shortfall for the next year comes in at some 12 billion Euro, or about 8% of our spending on social affairs and healthcare.

I bet increased transparency in both the social and healthcare domains can surface lots of potential savings, by exposing inefficiencies etc. Even if you shave of just a few percents of spending that way, it may actually fix the hole in the national budget completely.